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This works fine on Linux (Debian):

sed -e 's,^[ \t]*psd\(.*\)\;,,' 

On mac, I believe I have to use the -E flag, instead of -e:

sed -E 's,^[ \t]*psd\(.*\)\;,,'

but the regexp does not match, and hence does not remove the lines I want.

Any tips on how to solve this?

Sample input:

apa
bepa
    psd(cepa);
depa psd(epa);
  psd(fepa gepa hepa);

For that input, the expected output is:

apa
bepa
depa psd(epa);
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1  
Your expected output should have a couple of blank lines. You don't need to escape a semicolon. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 20 '11 at 13:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The -E flag means to use extended regular expressions. You should just use -e, as on Linux. The sed in Mac OS X is based on BSD sed, so doesn't have the GNU extensions.

After copying your sample input:

[~ 507] pbpaste | sed -e 's,^[[:space:]]*psd\(.*\);,,'
apa
bepa

depa psd(epa);
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The '\t' is not standard in 'sed', it is a GNU extension.

To match a 'tab', you need to put a real 'tab' in your script. This is easy in a file, harder in shell.

The same problem can happen in AIX, Solaris and HP-UX or other UNIXes.

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2  
I missed that in my answer. You can always use POSIX character classes, either [[:space:]] or [[:blank:]] would work. To get a literal tab in the shell, pressing ctrl-v will give you a literal for the next character. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 20 '11 at 14:43

Alternatively you can use the GNU version of sed instead of the implementation provided by Mac OSX.

Mac port provides a port for it sudo port install gsed. After installing it you can use gsed instead of sed.

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2  
Or brew install gnu-sed --default-names for brewing people :) –  Anton Babenko May 12 at 21:25

I've check this sample input on my machine and faced the problem when in third line was tab character from the beginning of line and regexp ^[ \t]*psd\(.*\)\; didn't match it. This can be passed by sed character class [[:blank:]] that equal combination of space and tab character. So you can try the following:

sed -E 's,^[[:blank:]]*psd\(.*\)\;,,' demo.txt

this produce the following output:

apa
bepa

depa psd(epa);

but it keeps the empty lines in result. To get the exact output as you expected I used the following:

sed -n '/^[[:blank:]]*psd\(.*\)\;/!p' demo.txt

result:

apa
bepa
depa psd(epa);

this is just inverse output of matching pattern (!p).

EDIT: To match tab characters in regexp in sed (macosx) you can also try recommendation from How can I insert a tab character with sed on OS X?

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