Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do i make my program only use one if statement and an else statement?

import java.io.*;

public class TwoNum {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        String first="";
        String second="";

        BufferedReader in=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        try{
            System.out.print("Input the first number: ");
            first = in.readLine();

            System.out.print("Input the second number: ");
            second = in.readLine();

        } catch(IOException e){
            System.out.println("Error!");
        }

        int number1=Integer.parseInt(first);
        int number2=Integer.parseInt(second);

        if(number1==number2){
            System.out.println("EQUIVALENT");
        }
        if(number1>number2){
            System.out.println("GREATER THAN");
        }
        if(number1<number2){
            System.out.println("LESSER THAN");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Homework questions... –  Kawu Jul 20 '11 at 12:14
    
There are three different outputs. With one if and an else you can handle two. You will need another else-if. –  taskinoor Jul 20 '11 at 12:15
1  
Why the bloated code dump? Anyway, you have three code paths, so you'll need some to branch two times one way or another. You can use the ternary conditional operator ?: to write it all in one line, though. –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 12:16
    
@Kerrek SB, what do you mean Why the bloated code dump? –  Zhianc Jul 20 '11 at 12:18
    
I mean that it would have sufficed to show us the actual if statements that you want to improve without the entire ambient program text. Ask yourself, "do they really need to know all this"? –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 12:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here use this:

import java.io.*;

public class TwoNum {

public static void main(String[] args){

    String first="";
    String second="";

    BufferedReader in=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

    try{
        System.out.print("Input the first number: ");
        first = in.readLine();

        System.out.print("Input the second number: ");
        second = in.readLine();

    } catch(IOException e){
        System.out.println("Error!");
    }

    int number1=Integer.parseInt(first);
    int number2=Integer.parseInt(second);

    String result = null;

    if( number1 == number2 )
        result = "EQUIVALENT";
    else
        result = ( number1 > number2 ) ? "GREATER THAN" : "LESS THAN";

    System.out.println( result );

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
that seems to be outputting EQUIVALENT <br/> null when both numbers are the same. –  Zhianc Jul 20 '11 at 12:33
    
what should it output when two numbers are EQUIVALENT? –  quaertym Jul 20 '11 at 12:37
    
only the world EQUIVALENT, but the code above displays EQUIVALENT then null on another line when the two numbers which were inputted are the same. –  Zhianc Jul 20 '11 at 12:39
    
no, it does not output null, you should read code more carefully, it is so simple. –  quaertym Jul 20 '11 at 12:43
    
Ah yeah, just missed a bit of the code. thank you! this was the real answer, LoL. –  Zhianc Jul 20 '11 at 12:45
if(number1==number2){

  System.out.println("EQUIVALENT");
 }
 else if(number1>number2){

 System.out.println("GREATER THAN");
  }
 else{
 System.out.println("LESSER THAN");
}
share|improve this answer
    
@jc david, LOL...really? –  Moonbeam Jul 20 '11 at 12:25

A variant of qbert solution, using 'java.lang.ArithmeticException' and without allocating memory:

try {
  1 / (number2-number1);

  if(number1 > number2){
    System.out.println("GREATER THAN");
  } else {
    System.out.println("LESSER THAN");
  }      
}
catch (ArithmeticException e) {
  System.out.println("EQUIVALENT");
}
share|improve this answer

Another solution, in my opinion much better than the 'ArithmeticException' solution I previously submitted:

String res;
int i = number2 - number1;
if (i == 0) {
    res = "EQUIVALENT";
} else {
    String RES[] = { "GREATER THAN", "LESSER THAN" };
    int j = (i & (1 << 31)) >> 31;
    res = RES[j+1];
}
System.out.println(res);

To explain this a little, when 'number1' is gt 'number2', 'i' is negative. The leftmost bit of a number is 1 when it is negative, 0 otherwise. So I get this bit, with 'i & (1 << 31)' shit it right of 31, which gives me -1 for a negative number, 0 otherwise. And then I only have to do the array lookup to get the result.

share|improve this answer

try this

String msg="";
msg = ((number1==number2) ? "number1 and number2 is equal" : ((number1>number2) ? "number1 is greater than number2" : "number2 is greater than number1"));
System.out.println(msg);

without if using ternary operator

share|improve this answer

My idea, avoiding ternary operator. It allocates an array, catching the exception if the array size is negative.

import java.io.*;

public class TwoNum {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        String first="";
        String second="";

        BufferedReader in=new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

        try{
            System.out.print("Input the first number: ");
            first = in.readLine();

            System.out.print("Input the second number: ");
            second = in.readLine();

        } catch(IOException e){
            System.out.println("Error!");
        }

        int number1=Integer.parseInt(first);
        int number2=Integer.parseInt(second);

        try {
            int c[] = new int[number2-number1];
            if(number1==number2){
                System.out.println("EQUIVALENT");
            } else {
                System.out.println("LESSER THAN");
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("GREATER THAN");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@downvoter - please explain. I've tested this and it works. –  qbert220 Jul 20 '11 at 12:47
    
Not the downvoter, but it's highly unnecessary to create an array for this problem, whether it works or not. –  paranoid-android Jul 20 '11 at 14:08
    
I'm not claiming it's elegant or efficient. It's not a solution I'd use in a piece of production software. But then I'm not normally restricted to only using one if and one else. It is an artificial homework situation and this is a novel (IMHO), working solution, so I really don't understand the down vote. –  qbert220 Jul 20 '11 at 15:22
    
Granted, but ArithmeticException as shown by jfgagne is basically the same idea but would be much more efficient. I'm sure you know this, so I guess the downvote is just because it's beyond the scope of what was asked. I'll upvote. –  paranoid-android Jul 20 '11 at 15:30
    
Agreed - jfgagne's is more efficient. And will work with bigger numbers. I have used a similar technique to do compile time checking of constants in C before (the C compiler barfs if you try to allocate an array of negative size). –  qbert220 Jul 20 '11 at 15:39

String result = (number1==number2) ? "EQUIVALENT" : ((number1 > number2) ? "GREATER THAN" : "LESS THAN");

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.