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This question already has an answer here:

What is the sense of "Instance Initializers" in Java ?
Can't we just put that block of code at the beginning of the constructor instead?

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marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 包卓轩, Grzegorz Żur, Balder, DaImTo, Matti John Feb 12 '15 at 13:06

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it wouldn't be a big deal if java rids of this feature. – irreputable Jul 20 '11 at 14:36
10  
@irreputable, it's seldom that I need them, but anonymous classes can't have constructors, but they can have instance initializers, so we need it in the language. – Kaj Jul 20 '11 at 14:42
1  
@Kaj field initializers can do the job – irreputable Jul 20 '11 at 23:27
2  
@irreputable, Only if you need to assign a value to a field, not if you need to invoke methods. – Kaj Jul 21 '11 at 10:38

I use them very often, typically for creating and populating Map in one statement (rather than using an ugly static block):

private static final Map<String, String> CODES = new HashMap<String, String>() {
    {
        put("A", "Alpha");
        put("B", "Bravo");
    }
};

One interesting and useful embellishment to this is creating an unmodifiable map in one statement:

private static final Map<String, String> CODES = 
    Collections.unmodifiableMap(new HashMap<String, String>() {
    {
        put("A", "Alpha");
        put("B", "Bravo");
    }
});

Way neater than using static blocks and dealing with singular assignments to final etc.

And another tip: don't be afraid to create methods too that simplify your instance block:

private static final Map<String, String> CODES = new HashMap<String, String>() {
    {
        put("Alpha");
        put("Bravo");
    }

    void put(String code) {
        put(code.substring(0, 1), code);
    }
};
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3  
For people using instance initializers for collection population, look to the Guava Library as a more elegant and powerful alternative. The Maps class provides nice Map utilities and their Immutable* classes are particularly nice for the use case described here, see ImmutableMap. – dimo414 Aug 7 '13 at 15:48
    
@Bohemian I'm confused how were you able to invoke put(); ?? without the variable name preceding it? – Maximus Programus Dec 26 '13 at 21:34
2  
@goldencalf it's an anonymous class, which is an (on-the-fly) subclass*, so put() is an instance method, which are implicitly called on this - just like you can call toString() from any instance method without having to code this.toString(). In the example, I've added an overloaded version of put() that takes only one parameter and is only visible inside the class definition . – Bohemian Dec 27 '13 at 0:40
2  
Looks like a classic example of code that only the programmer himself is able to read (for a year after he wrote it, until he forgets what the hell he was thinking...) ;) – jackthehipster Jul 9 '14 at 11:58
    
@jack actually I find these easier to read, because they bind the object and its data into a single construct. Separated static initializer blocks are not oviously assiciated with the object being initialized, and can actually result in code that compiles but explodes at runtime. Anyway, it's like most programming idioms; once you get used to them they become second nature. – Bohemian Jul 9 '14 at 21:04

You could indeed put the code at the beginning of every constructor. However, that's precisely the point of an instance initializer: its code is applied to all constructors, which can be handy if you have many constructors and a bit of code that is common to all of them.

(If you're just starting out with programming, you might not have known that it is possible to create many constructors for the same class (as long as they take different parameters); this is known as constructor overloading. If you only have one constructor, then an instance initializer is indeed not very useful (Edit: Unless you abuse it in creative fashions, as illustrated in the other answers).)

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In addition, even with a single constructor, declaring and initializing together is more readable and slightly less risky than declaring here and initializing over there. – Andy Thomas Jul 20 '11 at 15:29

You can use the instance initializer when declaring an anonymous class, e.g., when perpetrating the Double Brace Initialization Idiom.

List<String> mylist = new ArrayList<String>(){{add("a"); add("b"); add("c");}};

Here you can initialize the object even though you can't add anything to the constructor (because the class is anonymous).

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2  
In this particular case, though, I would recommend using java.util.Arrays.<T>asList(T... ts) instead :-) – Platinum Azure Aug 15 '12 at 15:10

Since all of the code examples here use anonymous classes, I threw together this (slightly horrifying) class that demonstrates using instance initializers in a "proper" class. You can use them to do complex processing or handle exceptions at initialization time. Notice that these blocks are run before the constructor is run, but the constructor is run before initializers in a child class are run:

import java.util.Scanner;

public  class InstanceInitializer {
    int x;
    {
        try {
            System.out.print("Enter a number: ");
            x = Integer.parseInt(new Scanner(System.in).nextLine());
        } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
            x = 0;
        }
    }

    String y;
    {
        System.out.print("Enter a string: ");
        y = new Scanner(System.in).nextLine();
        for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            y += y;
    }

    public InstanceInitializer() {
        System.out.println("The value of x is "+x);
        System.out.println("The value of y is "+y);
    }

    public static class ChildInstanceInitializer extends InstanceInitializer {
        {
            y = "a new value set by the child AFTER construction";
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        new InstanceInitializer();
        new InstanceInitializer();
        System.out.println();
        System.out.println(new ChildInstanceInitializer().y);
        // This is essentially the same as:
        System.out.println(new InstanceInitializer(){
            {y = "a new value set by the child AFTER construction";}
        }.y);
    }
}

This outputs (something like):

Enter a number: 1
Enter a string: a
The value of x is 1
The value of y is aaaaaaaa
Enter a number: q
Enter a string: r
The value of x is 0
The value of y is rrrrrrrr

Enter a number: 3
Enter a string: b
The value of x is 3
The value of y is bbbbbbbb
a new value set by the child AFTER construction
Enter a number: s
Enter a string: Hello
The value of x is 0
The value of y is HelloHelloHelloHelloHelloHelloHelloHello 
a new value set by the child AFTER construction

Notice that the "new value" string is not set until after the parent class's constructor has already been called.

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