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The following works in C#:

interface I
{
    int X { get; }
}

class C : I
{
    public int X
    {
        get { ... }
        set { ... }
    }
}

The following does not work in VB.NET:

Interface I
    ReadOnly Property X As Integer
End Interface

Class C
    Implements I

    Public Property X As Integer Implements I.X
        Get
            ...
        End Get
        Set(value As Integer)
            ...
        End Set
    End Property
End Class

The error message Implementing property must have matching 'ReadOnly' or 'WriteOnly' specifiers is pretty self-explanatory, so I do know what's wrong here. It's also not a big issue, because it's quite easy to work around this limitiation.

I'm curious, though: Does anyone know why the VB designers decided to treat this case differently than in C#?

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I don't see a readonly on your property in the C version of the interface? –  Nikki9696 Jul 20 '11 at 15:14
    
@Nikki9696: The lack of a setter in the C# version is the equivalent, basically. –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '11 at 15:15
    
@Nikki9696 That's implied. The difference is that it doesn't need to be. But, Heinzi, you explicitly specify it in the VB.NET interface version, so that's a pretty big difference. –  Grant Thomas Jul 20 '11 at 15:16
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure about the VB side, but with the explicit interface implementation of I.X in C# you'd also get a complaint about the added setter:

interface I
{
    int X { get; }
}

class C : I
{
    int I.X  // explicit implementation of I.X
    {
        get { return 1; }
        set { }
    }
}

You get a similar error in C#. For the VB, may want to check out this SO thread: If an interface defines a ReadOnly Property, how can an implementer provide the Setter to this property ?

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+1, very good point! –  Heinzi Jul 20 '11 at 15:22
    
Unfortunately, though, I'm not a VB guy so I'm playing with the VB to see how to do the same thing as your first C# example... –  James Michael Hare Jul 20 '11 at 15:25
1  
Looks like someone else had this issue, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/6307335/… –  James Michael Hare Jul 20 '11 at 15:26

You need to provide a read-only property to implement I.X; if you want YourClass.X to be a read-write property, then the read-only that implements I.X should be given another name (e.g.

    Public Property Xreadonly As Integer Implements I.X

I'm not quite sure why .Net requires the use of three types of properties (read-only, write-only, and read-write), rather than simply allowing an object which declares a read-only property and a write-only property to be used as though it has a read-write property, but it does. Perhaps its because they wanted to ensure that an override of a getter will follow the same inheritance path as an override of a setter, but it would seem there are cases where regarding getters and setters as separate items would be more useful (in some cases, for example, it may be useful to have a property Get method return a type which is distinct from, but coercible to, the Set method type; or it may be useful to have multiple overloads of Set; neither is allowed in .net, though).

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You have ReadOnly on the Property in the Interface I but not in the inherited Class C so the Property signatures don't match, hence the error. I'm sure you can't add a set accessor to a ReadOnly Property too.

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The question is why can't you use a non readonly property to implement an interface that only wants a getter. –  CodesInChaos Jul 20 '11 at 17:59

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