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I'm working on a app that uses url rewrites and has a specific .htaccess configuration. When working on the app I have three eviorments:

  1. Developent on my local machine (localhost)
  2. Staging (staging.mydomain.com)
  3. Production (www.mydomain.com)

I am constantly pushing new upgrades to the staging and production environment and each time I overwrite the existing source code I have to go in an change the .htaccess file. Is there a way I can the .htaccess generic to the directory or have it automatically detect it's environment?

My current .htaccess file is below. I just un-comment the sections between the different environments but would love to stop doing that...

# Development

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Staging

# RewriteEngine on
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
# RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /html/app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Production

# RewriteEngine on
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
# RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
# RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

Thanks in advance!

Chuck

share|improve this question
    
Why are the paths differing, yet /favicon.ico is the same? –  Rudi Visser Jul 20 '11 at 15:17
2  
I'd just set up virtual hosts so you have the same URLs in each environment. Then you wouldn't need to change the .htaccess between them. –  Quentin Jul 20 '11 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
# Development

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_HOST} ^localhost
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Staging

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_HOST} ^staging.mydomain.com
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /html/app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Production

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !=/favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_HOST} ^www.mydomain.com
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]
share|improve this answer

One option would be to setup environment variables in httpd.conf (or elsewhere) that define your environment.

For example (in httpd.conf):

SetEnv ENVIRONMENT production

(in .htaccess)

RewriteEngine on

# Development
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} != /favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{ENV:ENVIRONMENT} = development
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Staging
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} != /favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{ENV:ENVIRONMENT} = staging
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /html/app/index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

# Production
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} != /favicon.ico
RewriteCond %{ENV:ENVIRONMENT} = production
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /index.php?request=$1 [L,QSA]

Untested, but I think the concept is sound enough to figure out any issues ;-)

share|improve this answer

Can you not just place your .htaccess files on each of the environments, and then just ignore the file in whatever FTP or deploy program you're using?

Alternative, what I do is set up VirtualHosts in my local host that is the same domain as the production site, but with a dev. prefix. For example, www.example.com and dev.example.com. That way, I can always be certain that the root is the top-level directory of whatever host I'm using, no matter the environment; and I don't need to re-write my .htaccess directives.

share|improve this answer

Chuck D, the variant of Dumitru Ceban is very good. But I suggest you to try also option to have some flag in your code -- not in .htacces.

Also, good suggestion of rudi_visser. But I want to add here, that in the ideal system we should only use apache`s *.conf and decline .htaccess (just a stupid performance).

So I suggest you to have some flag in code, avoid .htacess (if you can) and switch env. by simple conf value or by some logic like if locaslhost == host then ...

share|improve this answer
    
Or for ideal system we just could use only-*.conf on production. –  gaRex Jul 20 '11 at 15:44
    
I don't think the performance of .htaccess on modern systems is anything to worry about anymore! But anyway I don't think putting this logic into code would help in this situation due to the fact that Apache won't know where to route the requests anyway. –  Rudi Visser Jul 20 '11 at 15:58
    
@rudi_visser, not sure, that .htaccess is adequate on production. And PHP could know where to pass which logic inside your framework: which DB connection of tmp/pathes to use. –  gaRex Jul 20 '11 at 23:03
    
Ah yes for stuff like that, but I mean the main routing to index.php obviously couldn't be done in index.php itself, I thought that's what you meant :-) But again, if an environment variable was to be set as per my suggestion, you could use that within PHP to determine what action to take too! –  Rudi Visser Jul 21 '11 at 7:12
    
The best practice I think would be a deploy script (like capistrano) which deploys the application code and just symlink the right htaccess file based on the environment you deploy to. –  Dumitru Ceban Jul 21 '11 at 9:14

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