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I have a very simple mapping which looks like this (I streamlined the example a bit):

{
    "location" : {
        "properties": {
            "name": { "type": "string", "boost": 2.0, "analyzer": "snowball" },
            "description": { "type": "string", "analyzer": "snowball" }
        }
    }
}

Now I index a lot of locations using some random values which are based on real English words.

I'd like to be able to search for locations that match any of the given keywords in either the name or the description field (name is more important, hence the boost I gave it). I tried a few different queries and they don't return any results.

{
    "fields" : ["name", "description"],
    "query" : {
        "terms" : {
            "name" : ["savage"],
            "description" : ["savage"]
        },
        "from" : 0,
        "size" : 500
    }
}

Considering there are locations which have the word savaged in the description it should get me some results (savage is the stem of savaged). It yields 0 results using the above query. I've been using curl to query ES:

curl -XGET -d @query.json http://localhost:9200/myindex/locations/_search

If I use query string instead:

curl -XGET http://localhost:9200/fieldtripfinder/locations/_search?q=description:savage

I actually get one result (of course now it would be searching the description field only).

Basically I am looking for a query that will do a OR kind of search using multiple keywords and compare them to the values in both the name and the description field.

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Snowball stems "savage" into "savag" that’s why term "savage" didn't return any results. However, when you specify "savage" on URL, it’s getting analyzed and you get results. Depending on what your intention is, you can either use correct stem ("savag") or analyze your terms by using "match" query instead of "terms":

{
  "fields" : ["name", "description"],
  "query" : {
    "bool" : {
      "should" : [
        {"match" : {"name" : "savage"}},
        {"match" : {"description" : "savage"}}
      ]
    },
    "from" : 0,
    "size" : 500
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, you're right about the stem! I was just thinking that ES should be able to find any word that is a derivative (so savage, savagely or savaged should all yield results), seems like I'm using wrong query for that. I tried the one you provided, but it fails with "No query registered for [text]". – Pawel Krakowiak Jul 21 '11 at 7:35
    
Hmm, which version of elasticsearch are you using? Did you modify the query in any way? If yes, can you post your query? I just tried running it with master and it works: gist.github.com/1097105 – imotov Jul 21 '11 at 12:40
    
I'm using version 0.16.2. It looks like part of my problems is curl on Windows, Windows' command line sucks. :( Can you tell me how many results should that last query return? – Pawel Krakowiak Jul 21 '11 at 14:11
    
This is the output that script in my comment produced gist.github.com/1097286 – imotov Jul 21 '11 at 14:21
    
Looks good. Thank you very much for taking the extra time to actually write those scripts. It seems like something was awry with my elasticsearch installation. I just wiped out the whole directory including all data and put a fresh 0.17.1 there, then I incorporated the text query into my application (I still can't properly run those multiline queries on Windows) and it started working. It finds "professional" when I look for "professionalism" or "aggressive" when I look for "aggression" - exactly what I need. – Pawel Krakowiak Jul 21 '11 at 15:13

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