Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Given that i have a uint value of 2402914, and i would like to grab the leftmost 17 bits, where is the fault in my logic by doing this code:

int testop = 0;
byte[] myArray = BitConverter.GetBytes(2402914);    
fixed (byte* p = &myArray[0])    
{   
    testop = *p >> 15;    
}

my expected output is

50516.
share|improve this question
2  
What value are you actually getting? – FishBasketGordo Jul 20 '11 at 15:39
    
What do you get? – James Jul 20 '11 at 15:40
    
myArray is: [98, 170, 36, 0] *p is a pointer to myArray[0] or, (byte)98, which you are then shifting 15 places, right out of the 8 bit range. I think. I'm a little rusty with bit manipulation. – asawyer Jul 20 '11 at 15:43
    
Is it just me, or is that not C#, but C or C++? I think I see pointers in there. Unless I'm missing something obvious. – Andy West Jul 20 '11 at 15:43
2  
Wow, that's awesome. Sorry to clutter this post with my ignorance. :) Can't believe I missed this. – Andy West Jul 20 '11 at 15:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

*p just gives you the first byte; it is equivalent to p[0]. You'll have to use shifting and ORing to combine bits from the first three bytes (or the last three bytes, depending on endianness...)

If this code is not a simplified version of something more complicated and you're actually trying to just extract the leftmost 17 bits from an int, this should do:

int testop = (someInt >> 15) & 0x1ffff;

(Edit: Added & 0x1ffff to make it work for negative integers too; thanks to @James.)

share|improve this answer
    
Aasmund, That was what i had come up with originally. Although it worked, I still wanted to understand why my shifting wasn't working. It makes sense, but i was hoping that the pointer was to the first entry into the array, and would continue further into memory as i shifted. Oh well. – Jason Jul 20 '11 at 15:46
    
@Jason: The moment you dereference the pointer, you receive a single byte value, and any operations on it can only see that byte and not what's beside it. – Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 20 '11 at 15:50
    
@Jason: But if you want to extract bits from an int, can't you just apply >> directly to the int? See my edit. – Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 20 '11 at 15:52
    
Could the downvoter explain his reasons? – Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 20 '11 at 16:21
1  
I didn't downvote you but you need to watch out for sign preservation when right shifting signed ints. – James Jul 20 '11 at 21:54

You might want to get your expectations to match reality. A right-shift is equivalent to dividing by 2. You are effectively dividing by 2 fifteen times, which is the same as saying you are dividing by 2^15 = 32768. Note that 2402914 / 32768 = 73 (truncating the remainder).

Therefore, I would expect the result to be 73, not 50516.

In fact,

2402914_10 = 0000 0000 0010 0100 1010 1010 0110 0010_2

So that the left-most seventeen bits are

             0000 0000 0010 0100 1

Note that

0000 0000 0010 0100 1 = 1 * 1 + 0 * 2 + 0 * 4 + 1 * 8 + 0 * 16 + 0 * 32 + 1 * 64 
                      = 73

Note that you can obtain this result more simply with

int testop = 2402914 >> 15;
share|improve this answer
1  
He's not shifting an int (although that's what he intends to do), he's shifting a byte. The result becomes zero. – Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 20 '11 at 15:51
    
@Aasmund Eldhuset: What? "Given that i have a uint value of 2402914, and i would like to grab the leftmost 17 bits, where is the fault in my logic by doing this code" and "my expected output is 50516." His expected output based on the question he stated is wrong. – jason Jul 20 '11 at 15:55
    
@Jason - Aasmund is right in my intent. This is just a case of a C++ mindset trying to be applied in a C# world. – Jason Jul 20 '11 at 15:56
1  
@Jason (the question asker) I'd be very surprised if this code works as you intend in C/C++. I expect C++ to give the same result as C# here. So what has a C++ mindset to do with this? – CodesInChaos Jul 20 '11 at 16:00
    
@Jason: This has nothing to do with language issues. If you take 2402914 and want its seventeen most significant bits as the seventeen least significant bits of some integer you will get 73, not 50516 as you expect. To obtain this result, you merely shift by 15 bits. You can do this is any modern language derived by C by 2402914 >> 15. – jason Jul 20 '11 at 16:00

Wow, this has been a really fun puzzle to figure out. Not the programming part, but trying to figure out where you got the number 50516 and what you are trying to do with your code. It looks like you are taking the 16 least significant bits and ROTATING them LEFT 9 bits.

2402914: 0000 0000 0010 0100 1010 1010 0110 0010
 left 9: 0100 1001 0101 0100 1100 010 
  match:                     ^^^^ ^^^  
>>50516:                     1100 0101 0101 0100
  match:                             ^ ^^^^ ^^^^
right 7:                             1 0101 0100 110 0010

int value2 = value & 0xffff;
int rotate9left = ((value2 << 9) & 0xffff) | ((value2) >> (16 - 9));

I don't know why you are using a byte array, but it seems like you think your fixed() statement is looping through the array, which it is not. Your statement in the fixed block is taking the byte value at myArray[0] and SHIFTing it right 15 bits (shifting fills with 0s as opposed to rotating which wraps the front bits around to the back). Any thing over 8 would give you zero.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Nice one. Was wondering where that number had come from. – Jon Egerton Jul 20 '11 at 22:15

From what I understand, you can apply the bit-shift operator directly to the int datatype, rather than going through the trouble of the unsafe code.

For example:

2402914 >> 15 = 73

This ties to the result predicted by Jason.

Further, I note that

2402914 >> 5 = 75091
and 2402914 >> 6 = 37545

This suggests that your required result cannot be achieved by any similar right shift.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.