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So, I am trying to learn how to use (and extend) Groovy, and I am following the example from this page. Basically, it shows how to define an annotation for Groovy code that lets you hook in to the compiler process. The example revolves around writing and annotation that will cause lines to be printed before and after method calls.

My code goes as follows; first the necessary imports:


package foo

import org.codehaus.groovy.transform.*
import java.lang.annotation.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.ast.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.control.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.ast.stmt.*
import org.codehaus.groovy.ast.expr.*

Then, we define the annotation that is to be used:


@Retention(RetentionPolicy.SOURCE)
@Target([ElementType.METHOD])
@GroovyASTTransformationClass(["foo.LoggingASTTransformation"])
public @interface WithLogging {
}

Then the transformation itself:

@GroovyASTTransformation(phase=CompilePhase.SEMANTIC_ANALYSIS)
public class LoggingASTTransformation implements ASTTransformation {

public void visit(ASTNode[] nodes, SourceUnit sourceUnit) { println("visiting astnodes") List methods = sourceUnit.getAST()?.getMethods() // find all methods annotated with @WithLogging methods.findAll { MethodNode method -> method.getAnnotations(new ClassNode(WithLogging)) }.each { MethodNode method -> Statement startMessage = createPrintlnAst("Starting $method.name") Statement endMessage = createPrintlnAst("Ending $method.name")

      List existingStatements = method.getCode().getStatements()
      existingStatements.add(0, startMessage)
      existingStatements.add(endMessage)
  }

}

private Statement createPrintlnAst(String message) { return new ExpressionStatement( new MethodCallExpression( new VariableExpression("this"), new ConstantExpression("println"), new ArgumentListExpression( new ConstantExpression(message) ) ) ) } }

Finally, my code that is supposed to use this transformation:

public class Foo
{
   @WithLogging
   def f() { println "hello from f" }

}

f = new Foo() f.f()

Now, this is supposed to print "Starting f\n hello from f \n Ending f", but all it prints is "hello from f" (and therein lies my problem). As you can see from the code, I have also put a "visiting astnodes" message in the transformation itself, to hopefully see if it ever gets there, but alas it doesn't (or so it seems).

"groovy -version" prints "Groovy Version: 1.6.0 JVM: 1.6.0_11"

Could anyone try this code and see if it works on their system, or give me some pointers as to what could be wrong? Thanks.

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1  
Did you ever figure it out? I'm having the exact same problem right now. –  Kyle Dec 18 '10 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

Try changing the code that is suppose use the transformation to

public class Foo
{
   @foo.WithLogging
   def f() { println "hello from f"}
....

I tried the same example and shared my experience here http://kartik-shah.blogspot.com/2009/03/groovy-16-ast-transformation-example_5323.html

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Thank you for your answer. I would like to read your blog entry, but clicking on the link just displays "page not found". –  Eyvind Mar 27 '09 at 7:45
    
Not sure why URL does not come up. kartik-shah.blogspot.com/2009/03/… If that still does not work for you, please use kartik-shah.blogspot.com –  Kartik Shah Apr 27 '09 at 21:54

I found here working example on github

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