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I created a function in a module:

Public Function createTable()
    Dim db As Database
    Dim tdf As TableDef
    Dim fld As Field

    Set db = CurrentDb()
    Set tdf = db.CreateTableDef("161-0363")

    Set fld = tdf.CreateField("SKUS", dbText, 30)
    tdf.Fields.Append fld

    Set fld = tdf.CreateField("Count", dbInteger)
    tdf.Fields.Append fld
End Function

Then called this function in a macro using "RunCode". But no table is created when I run the macro? Can anyone help me out?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On your Macro Design View, you should have it say RunCode, then in your Function Name it should say createTable()

Does the code create a table if you run it without a macro?

EDIT: Update your code to this then run your macro

Public Function createTable()
   Dim db As DAO.Database
    Dim tdf As DAO.TableDef
    Dim fld As Field

    Set db = CurrentDb()
    Set tdf = db.CreateTableDef("161-0363")

    Set fld = tdf.CreateField("SKUS", dbText, 30)
    tdf.Fields.Append fld

    Set fld = tdf.CreateField("Count", dbInteger)
    tdf.Fields.Append fld

    db.TableDefs.Append tdf
    db.TableDefs.Refresh
End Function

I just tested the above code and it created the table. You needed to add the last lines of code to get it to work.

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Thats exactly what I did. How would you run this without a macro? –  Shubham Jul 20 '11 at 16:26
    
Oh Thanks a bunch that worked, yea that makes sense you would have to append the table. Also what does adding DAO to the declarations do? I tried without and it still worked? –  Shubham Jul 20 '11 at 16:35
    
glad it worked, i used DAO to make things clearer but it isn't necessary –  bluefeet Jul 20 '11 at 16:37
    
Pedantic clarification, bluefeet: adding DAO isn't necessary unless there's also a reference to ADO (and it still isn't necessary unless the ADO reference is higher in the list than the DAO reference). –  RolandTumble Jul 20 '11 at 20:01
1  
I put the DAO qualifier on all the DAO data types, even the ones that don't overlap with ADO, simply because it makes for clearer code. Also, it means I don't have to know a damned thing about ADO, which I don't use in the first place. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 22 '11 at 22:35

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