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I'm trying to create a mock for my IRepository interface:

public interface IRepository<T> : ICollection<T>, IQueryable<T>
{
}

With this implementation:

public class RepositoryFake<T> : List<T>, IRepository<T>
{
    public Expression Expression
    {
        get
        {
            return this.AsQueryable().Expression;
        }
    }

    public Type ElementType
    {
        get
        {
            return this.AsQueryable().ElementType;
        }
    }

    public IQueryProvider Provider
    {
        get
        {
            return this.AsQueryable().Provider;
        }
    }
}

But when I use it, I'm getting StackOverflow exception. How to implement this interface correctly to be able to use just a List as a repository?

Usage is very simple

[Test]
public void Test()
{
    RepositoryFake<User> users = new RepositoryFake<User>();
    users.Add(new User());

    List<User> list = (from user in users 
                 where user.Id == "5"
                 select user).ToList();

    Assert.That(list, Is.Empty);
}

Here is screenshot of exception:

Exception

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2  
"But when I use it" -- show us the code? Show us the stack trace? –  cdhowie Jul 20 '11 at 16:39
    
What are you trying to do? My best guess is you are hoping for some magic. The behavior is completely expected. –  leppie Jul 20 '11 at 16:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The reason for your problem is that if you perform AsQueryable it checks if the object already implements IQueryable and if yes returns it.

Use new EnumerableQuery<T>(this) instead of AsQueryable which doesn't perform this check.


Workaround for .net 3.5:

return ((IEnumerable<T>)this).Select(x=>x).AsQueryable()

First casts to IEnumerable<T> so the chosen Select method will be Enumerable.Select not Queryable.Select. The identity select will then return a new object that does not implement IQueryable<T>, so the check if it's implemented in AsQueryable fails.

share|improve this answer
    
It has protected contructor?.. –  Sly Jul 20 '11 at 16:45
    
The constructor taking an IEnumerable<T> is public. Check msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc190806.aspx At least on .net 4 –  CodesInChaos Jul 20 '11 at 16:47
    
@CodeInChaos: New in .NET 4. –  leppie Jul 20 '11 at 16:48
    
Added a workaround that will hopefully work on .net 3.5. –  CodesInChaos Jul 20 '11 at 16:51
1  
Second option did the job. Thanks! –  Sly Jul 20 '11 at 16:55
show 4 more comments

Try using base.AsQueryable() instead of this.AsQueryable().

share|improve this answer
    
Base class doesn't have such an extension –  Sly Jul 20 '11 at 16:53
    
Wouldn't help anyways since the check if IQueryable<T> is already implemented uses the runtime type. This is no virtual method. –  CodesInChaos Jul 20 '11 at 16:56
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