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I need a programmatic way to get the decimal value of each character in a String, so that I can encode them as HTML entities, for example:

UTF-8:

著者名

Decimal:

著者名
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There's no such thing as a "UTF-8 character" or "decimal encoding". "UTF-8" is an encoding, and "decimal" is a number base. –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 18:10
    
You're right. I've revised the question –  Mike Sickler Jul 20 '11 at 18:13
    
Cheers. I don't know Java, but since your characters are in the BMP, they're just the literal values of the string elements (Java has 16-bit strings) -- can't you just say str[0], etc.? –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I suspect you're just interested in a conversion from char to int, which is implicit:

for (int i = 0; i < text.length(); i++)
{
    char c = text.charAt(i);
    int value = c;
    System.out.println(value);
}

EDIT: If you want to handle surrogate pairs, you can use something like:

for (int i = 0; i < text.length(); i++)
{
    int codePoint = text.codePointAt(i);
    // Skip over the second char in a surrogate pair
    if (codePoint > 0xffff)
    {
        i++;
    }
    System.out.println(codePoint);
}
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What does codePointAt do if you point it into the middle of a surrogate couple? –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 19:46
    
@Kerrek: I believe it returns the low surrogate, i.e. it only acts differently when it finds a high surrogate. –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '11 at 19:52

Ok after reading Jon's post and still musing about surrogates in Java, I decided to be a bit less lazy and google it up. There's actually support for surrogates in the Character class it's just a bit.. roundabout

So here's the code that'll work correctly, assuming valid input:

    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        char ch = str.charAt(i);
        if (Character.isHighSurrogate(ch)) {
            System.out.println("Codepoint: " + 
                   Character.toCodePoint(ch, str.charAt(i + 1)));
            i++;
        }
        System.out.println("Codepoint: " + (int)ch);
    }
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There's actually some support in String as well, which makes this a bit simpler - see my revised answer. –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '11 at 18:40
    
@Jon Skeet: Yeah the string method is decidedly nicer. And I agree that it's not really a problem most of the time - apart from ancient scripts (hardly of interest for the general public), the only thing of interest there seem to be some mathematical and musical symbols. But it's such a rare chance to be able to nitpick a bit ;) –  Voo Jul 20 '11 at 19:11
    
Well, the fundamental problem remains that UTF-16 is a variable-width encoding and that there's no O(1) algorithm to determine the number of codepoints in a string, or even to check that the string is a valid sequence of Unicode codepoints. –  Kerrek SB Jul 20 '11 at 22:32

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