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New to Java...

I have a name class that has:

private String firstName;
private String middleInitial;
private String lastName;

as its instance variables.

If I had certain data that had only firstName and lastName, no middleInitial, how would I make the constructor so that it took only 2 parameters instead of three?

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8 Answers 8

You simply write a constructor with two parameters and a constructor with three

public YourClass(String firstName, String lastName) {
   ...
}

public YourClass(String firstName, String middleInitial, String lastName) {
    ...
}

Callers can then choose to use the appropriate constructor based on their needs.

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Well, two options:

  • Just have a constructor with three parameters, and call it using null or the empty string for middleInitial
  • Overload the constructors, possibly calling one from the other.

As an example for the latter, using an empty string as the default middle initial:

public Person(String firstName, String middleInitial, String lastName)
{
    this.firstName = firstName;
    this.middleInitial = middleInitial;
    this.lastName = lastName;
}


public Person(String firstName, String lastName)
{
    this(firstName, "", lastName);
}

However, the compiler will need to know which one you're calling from the call site. So you can do:

new Person("Jon", "L", "Skeet");

or

new Person("Jon", "Skeet");

... but you can't do:

// Invalid
new Person(firstName, gotMiddleInitial ? middleInitial : ???, lastName);

and expect the compiler to decide to use the "two name" variant instead.

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Hint: I think you will score some extra upvotes when you provide a getFullName() method. –  Martijn Courteaux Jul 20 '11 at 18:59
2  
+1 For suggesting that the 2-argument constructor call the 3-argument constructor. –  Brian Jul 20 '11 at 19:02
    
Defining, and documenting, the canonical constructor is a very good practice. Makes subclassing more understandable and concentrates initialization logic in one place. +1 to answer and @Brian –  ptomli Jul 20 '11 at 19:25

In Java, constructors can't have default arguments. Your only option here is to write two constructors. Fortunately, Java does allow you to call constructors from other constructors. You could do something like:

public class MyClass {
    private String firstName;
    private String middleInitial;
    private String lastName;

    public MyClass(String firstName, String middleInitial, String lastName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
        this.middleInitial = middleInitial;
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }

    public MyClass(String firstName, String lastName) {
        this(firstName, "", lastName);
    }

    ...
}
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You could use two constructors:

public Person(String firstName, String lastName)
{
    this(firstName, null, lastName);
}

public Person(String firstName, String middleInitial, String lastName)
{
    this.firstName     = firstName;
    this.middleInitial = middleInitial;
    this.lastName =    = lastName;
}
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Define 2 constructors, one with 2 parameters and one with 3 parameters.

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You can write two constructors.

public Person( String firstName, String lastName, String middleName ) { ... }

public Person( String firstName, String lastName ) { ... }
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public void myBike(String name, String color)
{
      System.out.println("My bike's name is " + name + " and is " + color + ".");
}

public void myBike(String name, String color, float height)
{
      System.out.println("My bike's name is " + name + " and is " + color + ".");
      System.out.println("My bike is also " + height + " inches tall.");
}
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public Class Name{
private String first;
private String middle;
private String last;

public Name(String first, String middle, String last){
this.first = first;
this.middle = middle;
this.last = last;
}

public Name(String first, String last){
this.first = first;
this.last = last;
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work. The second two constructors have the same signature (Name(String, String)), so it's ambiguous. –  jpm Jul 20 '11 at 18:57
    
@jpm - thank you. That what happens if you are in a hurry. Removed the third one. –  OpenSource Jul 21 '11 at 4:49

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