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I've got some legacy code I'm trying to compile, and my available compilers are choking. Here are the lines causing the problems:

line 5:

DIMENSION MMO(12)/31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31/

lines 7, 8:

DEFINE FILE 4(ANSI,FB,140,3360,0)
DEFINE FILE 7(SDF, ,42,42)

line 119:

1905 FORMAT(J2,J4,J2,29I5)

Lahey-Fujistu 95 says:

1116-S: "fz32.f", line 5, column 24: Comma expected.
1110-S: "fz32.f", line 5, column 28: Missing name.
1336-S: "fz32.f", line 7, column 7: DEFINE FILE statement not supported.
1336-S: "fz32.f", line 8, column 7: DEFINE FILE statement not supported.
1511-S: "fz32.f", line 119: Invalid character string 'J' found in format specification.
1515-S: "fz32.f", line 119: Edit descriptor must be specified after the repeat specification in a format specification.

...and more missing name errors

gfortran 77 says:

fz32.f:5:
         DIMENSION MMO(12)/31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31/
                          ^
Invalid form for DIMENSION statement at (^)
fz32.f:7:
         DEFINE FILE 4(ANSI,FB,140,3360,0)
         1                     2
Unrecognized statement name at (1) and invalid form for assignment or statement-function definition at (2)
fz32.f:8:
         DEFINE FILE 7(SDF, ,42,42)
         1                  2
Unrecognized statement name at (1) and invalid form for assignment or statement-function definition at (2)
fz32.f:119:
    1905 FORMAT(J2,J4,J2,29I5)
                ^
Unrecognized FORMAT specifier at (^)
fz32.f:119:
    1905 FORMAT(J2,J4,J2,29I5)
                   ^
Unrecognized FORMAT specifier at (^)
fz32.f:119:
    1905 FORMAT(J2,J4,J2,29I5)
                      ^
Unrecognized FORMAT specifier at (^)

gcc fails with similar errors.

So does anyone know what compiler could have been used to build this code?

Also, on lines 7 and 8, ANSI and SDF are not defined earlier in the code. How do these lines work? I expect them to be formatting flags, but I don't see that documented anywhere.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This one:

DIMENSION MMO(12)/31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31/

is just a non-standard version of a data statement. In F77 you could do

  DIMENSION MMO(12)
  DATA MMO /31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31/

or in modern fortran you could do

  integer, dimension(12) ::  mmo = [31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31 ]

The define stuff is a little more obscure (and probably identifies the compiler as a DEC compiler or related -- oof, that's old). It looks like you're going to want to convert

DEFINE FILE 4(ANSI,FB,140,3360,0)
DEFINE FILE 7(SDF, ,42,42)

Into something like

OPEN(unit=4, access='direct', reclen=FB)
OPEN(unit=7, access='direct')

and see how that goes.

The J specifier I can't find anywhere (and googling for J is about as helpful as you'd think). So maybe I'm wrong about DEC. Can you give us an example as to how format 1905 is used?

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I knew DEC FORTRAN pretty well in the 1980s and KRONOS and NOS (from CDC) in the 1970s and a few others in the era (GCOS and several third party RSX implementations). None of the code I worked with was heavy in file record management features. The OP code looks alien, even with my ancient background. The only major FORTRAN I did not work with was the IBM dinosaurs, hence my suspicion in my answer. –  wallyk Jul 21 '11 at 4:19
    
DEC looks the closest from what I've seen so far, but I still can't find any reference to 'j' as a format. It was writing int data, and someone guessed that it was shorthand for 'i.2' or similar. There wasn't that much code, so it was pretty easy to rewrite with the pointers from here. Thanks guys. –  Ethan Shepherd Jul 21 '11 at 16:25

DEFINE FILE are likely from IBM OS/360's FORTRAN compiler and are related to the operating system JCL. There are probably other implementations, but there is no need (and little utility) on a modern o/s to specify the future number of records and record size in a file. See this for details.

The initialized dimension (a non-standard language extension) can be changed to a data statement:

DIMENSION MMO(12)
DATA MMO/31,28,31,30,31,30,31,31,30,31,30,31/

I vaguely recall coming across the J format code before, but don't recall what it means. Given the context, you might change them to I and see if that will work:

1905 FORMAT(I2,I4,I2,29I5)
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Wow, +1 for invoking JCL and OS/360. –  Jonathan Dursi Jul 20 '11 at 21:11

I think that these are all non-standard Fortran. That was pretty common up to FORTRAN 77 when the vendors tried to compete by offering convenient extensions. It was also a lock-in trap, but people were less sensitive to that back then. I think that you would be better off translating your code to standard compliant by deducing what this stuff is supposed to do. It depends on how many lines that you have how difficult that would be. There are some code conversion products (e.g., SPAG, http://www.polyhedron.com/spagqa0html) -- I don't know whether they would understand these extensions.

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