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I am trying to write a custom string splitting function, and it is harder than I would have expected.

Basically, I pass in a string and an array of the values that the string will split on, and it will return an array of substrings, removing empty ones and including the values it splits on. If the string can be split at the same place by two different values, the longer one has precedence.

That is,

split("Go ye away, I want some peace && quiet. & Thanks.", ["Go ", ",", "&&", "&", "."]);

should return

["Go ", "ye away", ",", " I want some peace ", "&&", " quiet", ".", " ", "&", " Thanks", "."]

Can you think of a reasonably simple algorithm for this? If there is a built-in way to do this in Javascript (I don't think there is), it would be nicer.

share|improve this question
    
Should "ye " and "away" be split? Seems like that should just be one if I'm understanding. –  James Montagne Jul 20 '11 at 20:45
    
Did you mean to include " " as one of your delimiters? Your output seems to indicate that, but your input doesn't. –  Raul Agrait Jul 20 '11 at 20:46
    
@kingjiv Yes, that was a mistake. It should be fixed now. –  Peter Olson Jul 20 '11 at 20:48
    
@Raul No. The output only has a string alone if it is between two delimeters. You'll notice that " I want some peace " does not split on spaces. –  Peter Olson Jul 20 '11 at 20:49
1  
What could the use case possibly be for this? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 20 '11 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this?

function mySplit(input, delimiters) {

    // Sort delimiters array by length to avoid ambiguity
    delimiters.sort(function(a, b) {
       if (a.length > b.length) { return -1; }
       return 0;
    }

    var result = [];

    // Examine input one character at a time
    for (var i = 0; i < input.length; i++) {
        for (var j = 0; j < delimiters.length; j++) {
            if (input.substr(i, delimiters[j].length) == delimiters[j]) {

                // Add first chunk of input to result
                if (i > 0) {
                    result.push(input.substr(0, i));
                }
                result.push(delimiters[j]);

                // Reset input and iteration
                input = input.substr(i + delimiters[j].length);
                i = 0;
                j = 0;
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}

var input      = "Go ye away, I want some peace && quiet. & Thanks.";
var delimiters = ["Go ", ",", "&&", "&", "."];

console.log(mySplit(input, delimiters));
// Output: ["Go ", "ye away", ",", " I want some peace ",
//          "&&", " quiet", ".", " ", "&", " Thanks", "."]
share|improve this answer
    
It works, cool! I feel embarrassed...it's one third of the size of my own solution that didn't work correctly. –  Peter Olson Jul 20 '11 at 21:07
1  
This doesn't give precedence to a longer delimiter in the case of a conflict (a requirement in the question, I think). If you switch "&&" and "&" in the delimiters array it splits on "&" instead of "&&" –  Bob Jul 21 '11 at 0:21
    
Indeed. It has left-to-right priority. If the OP desires different semantics, he could sort the list of delimiters by length. But this was not stated in the question and there is no ambiguity in the given delimiter list. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 21 '11 at 8:55
    
[Edit: Oh, it was stated in the question! I'll add the sorting. Thanks @Bob!] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 21 '11 at 8:56

Exact solution asked for:

function megasplit(toSplit, splitters) {
    var splitters = splitters.sorted(function(a,b) {return b.length-a.length});
                                                          // sort by length; put here for readability, trivial to separate rest of function into helper function
    if (!splitters.length)
        return toSplit;
    else {
        var token = splitters[0];
        return toSplit
            .split(token)             // split on token
            .map(function(segment) {  // recurse on segments
                 return megasplit(segment, splitters.slice(1))
             })
            .intersperse(token)       // re-insert token
            .flatten()                // rejoin segments
            .filter(Boolean);
    }
}

Demo:

> megasplit(
      "Go ye away, I want some peace && quiet. & Thanks.",
      ["Go ", ",", "&&", "&", "."]
  )
["Go ", "ye away", ",", " I want some peace ", "&", "&", " quiet", ".", " ", "&", " Thanks", "."]

Machinery (reusable!):

Array.prototype.copy = function() {
    return this.slice()
}
Array.prototype.sorted = function() {
    var copy = this.copy();
    copy.sort.apply(copy, arguments);
    return copy;
}
Array.prototype.flatten = function() {
    return [].concat.apply([], this)
}
Array.prototype.mapFlatten = function() {
    return this.map.apply(this,arguments).flatten()
}
Array.prototype.intersperse = function(token) {
    // [1,2,3].intersperse('x') -> [1,'x',2,'x',3]
    return this.mapFlatten(function(x){return [token,x]}).slice(1)
}

Notes:

  • This required a decent amount of research to do elegantly:
  • This was further complicated by the fact the specification required that tokens (though they were to be left in the string) should NOT be split (or else you'd get "&", "&"). This made use of reduce impossible and necessitated recursion.
  • I also personally would not ignore empty strings with splits. I can understand not wanting to recursively split on the tokens, but I'd personally simplify the function and make the output act like a normal .split and be like ["", "Go ", "ye away", ",", " I want some peace ", "&&", " quiet", ".", " ", "&", " Thanks", ".", ""]
  • I should point out that, if you are willing to relax your requirements a little, this goes from being a 15/20-liner to a 1/3-liner:

1-liner if one follows canonical splitting behavior:

Array.prototype.mapFlatten = function() {
    ...
}
function megasplit(toSplit, splitters) {
    return splitters.sorted(...).reduce(function(strings, token) {
        return strings.mapFlatten(function(s){return s.split(token)});
    }, [toSplit]);
}

3-liner, if the above was hard to read:

Array.prototype.mapFlatten = function() {
    ...
}
function megasplit(toSplit, splitters) {
    var strings = [toSplit];
    splitters.sorted(...).forEach(function(token) {
        strings = strings.mapFlatten(function(s){return s.split(token)});
    });
    return strings;
}
share|improve this answer
    
How is this the "exact solution requested"? Your output does not match. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 21 '11 at 8:55

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