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So, let's say I have a large set of elements to which I want to attach event listeners. E.g. a table where I want each row to turn red when clicked.

So my question is which of these is the fastest, and which uses the least memory. I understand that it's (usually) a tradeoff, so I would like to know my best options for each.

Using the table example, let's say there's a list of all the row elements, "rowList":

Option 1:

for(var r in rowList){
     rowList[r].onclick = function(){ this.style.backgroundColor = "red" };
}

My gut feeling is that this is the fastest, since there is one less pointer call, but the most memory intensive, since each rowlist will have its own copy of the function, which might get serious if the onclick function is large.

Option 2:

function turnRed(){
     this.style.backgroundColor = "red";
}
for(var r in rowList){
     rowList[r].onclick = turnRed;
}

I'm guessing this is going to be only a teensy bit slower than the one above (oh no, one more pointer dereference!) but a lot less memory intensive, since the browser only needs to keep track of one copy of the function.

Option 3:

var turnRed = function(){
     this.style.backgroundColor = "red";
}
for(var r in rowList){
     rowList[r].onclick = turnRed;
}

I assume this is the same as option 2, but I just wanted to throw it out there. For those wondering what the difference between this and option 2 is: JavaScript differences defining a function

Bonus Section: Jquery

Same question with:

$('tr').click(function(){this.style.backgroundColor = "red"});

Versus:

function turnRed(){this.style.backgroundColor = "red"};
$('tr').click(turnRed);

And:

var turnRed = function(){this.style.backgroundColor = "red"};
$('tr').click(turnRed);
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Make a table with 10k rows, and use the profiler to get an idea how fast it will go, perhaps use Selenium to script out tests, to limit the effect of differences in how fast a human goes. Chrome and Firefox have nice profilers, but you may want to do something similar with IE8/9 to get an idea as to the impact. –  James Black Jul 20 '11 at 23:21
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's your answer:

http://jsperf.com/function-assignment

Option 2 is way faster and uses less memory. The reason is that Option 1 creates a new function object for every iteration of the loop.

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+1! I never knew about JSPerf.com, but I will use it to answer questions like this from now on. Thanks! –  Erty Jul 20 '11 at 23:24
    
The speed difference is most noticable in Chrome 12. It's <10% performance difference between the two methods in Opera11, IE8, FF5. –  jfriend00 Jul 20 '11 at 23:31
    
@jfriend00 You're right about that. –  Matt Jul 20 '11 at 23:44
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In terms of memory usage, your Option 1 is creating a distinct function closure for each row in your array. This approach will therefore use more memory than Option 2 and Option 3, which only create a single function and then pass around a reference to it.

For this same reason I would also expect Option 1 to be the slowest of the three. Of course, the difference in terms of real-world performance and memory usage will probably be quite small, but if you want the most efficient one then pick either Option 2 or Option 3 (they are both pretty much the same, the only real difference between the two is the scope at which turnRed is visible).

As for jQuery, all three options will have the same memory usage and performance characteristics. In every case you are creating and passing a single function reference to jQuery, whether you define it inline or not.

And one important note that is not brought up in your question is that using lots of inline functions can quickly turn your code into an unreadable mess and make it more difficult to maintain. It's not a big deal here since you only have a single line of code in your function, but as a general rule if your function contains more than 2-3 lines it is a good idea to avoid defining it inline. Instead define it as in Option 2 or Option 3 and then pass around a reference to it.

share|improve this answer
    
As for jQuery, all three options will have the same memory usage and performance characteristics. In every case you are creating and passing a single function reference to jQuery, whether you define it inline or not. That's useful to know! Thanks! –  Erty Jul 20 '11 at 23:28
    
+1 excellent answer! I often use Option 3 just for the scope reason. Then the global scope isn't polluted with a whole heap of small functions that aren't needed. I would also +2 for the note on inline functions becoming an unreadable mess if I could. –  James Khoury Jul 20 '11 at 23:28
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