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I need to erase a file in my program. My solution was to have an erase() method that would do that like so:

public static void erase(String string) {
    FileWriter fw = null;
    try {
        fw  = new FileWriter(string);
        fw.write(new String());
    } catch (IOException ie) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        fw.flush();
        fw.close(); 
    }
}

Several problems here:

  • If the fw does not properly initialize (for whatever reason, missing file, invalid persmissions, etc) then when I try to close it in the finally block, there is a NullPointerException.

  • If I don't have the finally block, then I might be throwing a NullPointerException for the reason above.

  • If I close the file inside the try block, then I might leak the resource if the file properly opens, but doesn't properly write.

What other problems am I overlooking and how can I harden this method?

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RandomAccessFile.setLength(0) might be more readable (and possibly more correct since character encodings may contain a BOM character or two). –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 21 '11 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can just wrap the finally functionality in an if-statement:

if(fw != null){
    fw.close(); 
}

This will ensure that if the file was ever opened, then it will be closed. If it wasn't opened in the first place, then it won't do anything, which is what you want.

Also, I'm not sure if it's just like that for posting, but it's generally not advisable to just print a stacktrace in a catch block and continue ("swallowing" the exception). You really should let the exception get thrown because this could hide bugs and make tracking them down very hard.

EDIT: See comment below.

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2  
Uh, guys, flushing already happens within the close statement, no need to perform it right before that. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 21 '11 at 0:34
    
@owlstead: Generally it's the implicit flush that can cause an IOException in close(); rather put the flush explicitly in the try block, which means it would be truly extraordinary for close to actually throw an exception. –  Lawrence Dol Jul 21 '11 at 3:55

To the best of my knowledge, this is the correct idiomatic way to write your code:

FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(string);
try {
    fw.write(new String());
    fw.flush();
} catch (IOException ie) {
    ie.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    fw.close(); 
}

Explanation:

  • If new FileWriter() throws an exception, then we don't need to clean up anything. The method exits without executing the finally.
  • We should put fw.flush() in the try, not in the finally. There are two reasons: If the write failed, then we shouldn't bother flushing. Also, if you put the flush() in finally and it throws an exception, then the close() will be skipped.
share|improve this answer
1  
Further comments: 1. new String() is the same as "". 2. close() automatically implies flush(). 3. If you want to delete a file, how about new File(filepath).delete()? 4. If you want to make the file zero bytes, how about new FileOutputStream(filepath).close()? –  Nayuki Minase Jul 21 '11 at 1:44
    
This fails to catch the IOException that is thrown from most Writer constructors. –  Lawrence Dol Jul 21 '11 at 3:53
    
Oops, good point. My bad. –  Nayuki Minase Jul 21 '11 at 14:10

Include the flush() in your main block and have only the close() in the catch. Then check for null before closing:

finally {
    if(fw!=null) { fw.close(); }
    }

With the flush in the main block, you can also try/catch the close and log or ignore any error:

finally {
    if(fw!=null) { 
        try { fw.close(); } catch(Throwable thr) { log.printError("Close failed: "+thr); thr.printStackTrace(); } 
        }
    }

or (not generally recommended):

finally {
    try { fw.close(); } catch(Throwable thr) {;}
    }

EDIT

The best general Java idiom for handling I/O, IMO, is:

FileWriter fw=null;
try {
    fw=new FileWriter(string);
    fw.write(new String());
    fw.close();
    fw=null;
    }
catch(IOException ie) {
    // do something real here to handle the exception, or don't catch it at all.
    } 
finally {
    if(fw!=null) { 
        try { fw.close(); } catch(Throwable thr) { thr.printStackTrace(); } // now we're really out of options
        }
    }    

This has the important effect of allowing the catch to catch and handle an exception thrown by close() itself. (The catch clause should only be present if you can handle the exception in some way; do NOT catch and ignore, and generally you should not simply catch and trace.)

share|improve this answer
    
Catching Throwable in the finally-block (and not re-throwing) seems unwise since it would hide potentially serious issues. Catching NPE would make more sense... but that just seems excessive when you can simply check for null. –  dhg Jul 21 '11 at 0:26
    
@dhg: Exactly, as my first suggestion does; but then you're left with throws IOException as a result of the close() if you handle IOException internally; and you have to ask yourself "if flush has already been done, then what can I do besides log an error if close fails"? –  Lawrence Dol Jul 21 '11 at 0:33

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