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In this simple short program, you will notice that the program hangs forever because the take() does not release the thread. According to my understanding, take() causes the thread to be released even though the task itself is blocked on take().

Edited:

This works (thanks to you all for fixing the autoboxing):

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;

public class ProducersConsumers {
    private static int THREAD_COUNT = 5;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ExecutionException, InterruptedException {
        final ExecutorService executorPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(THREAD_COUNT);
        final LinkedBlockingQueue<Long> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Long>();

        Collection<Future<Long>> collection = new ArrayList<Future<Long>>();


        // producer:
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
            collection.add(executorPool.submit(new Callable<Long>() {
                @Override
                public Long call() throws Exception {
                    for (int i = 100; i >= 0; i--) {
                        queue.put((long) i);
                    }
                    return -1L;
                }
            }));
        }

        // consumer:
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
            collection.add(executorPool.submit(new Callable<Long>() {
                @Override
                public Long call() throws Exception {
                    while (true) {
                        Long item = queue.take();
                        if (item.intValue() == 0) {
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                    return 1L;
                }
            }));
        }

        long sum = 0;
        for (Future<Long> item : collection) {
            sum += item.get();
        }

        executorPool.shutdown();
        System.out.println("sum = " + sum);
    }
}

But if you swap the producer and consumer invocations, it will hang:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;

public class ProducersConsumers {
    private static int THREAD_COUNT = 5;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ExecutionException, InterruptedException {
        final ExecutorService executorPool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(THREAD_COUNT);
        final LinkedBlockingQueue<Long> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Long>();

        Collection<Future<Long>> collection = new ArrayList<Future<Long>>();


        // consumer:
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
            collection.add(executorPool.submit(new Callable<Long>() {
                @Override
                public Long call() throws Exception {
                    while (true) {
                        Long item = queue.take();
                        if (item.intValue() == 0) {
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                    return 1L;
                }
            }));
        }

        // producer:
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
            collection.add(executorPool.submit(new Callable<Long>() {
                @Override
                public Long call() throws Exception {
                    for (int i = 100; i >= 0; i--) {
                        queue.put((long) i);
                    }
                    return -1L;
                }
            }));
        }

        long sum = 0;
        for (Future<Long> item : collection) {
            sum += item.get();
        }

        executorPool.shutdown();
        System.out.println("sum = " + sum);
    }
}

To my understanding the producer and consumer order should not matter. In other words, there is a notion of task and thread. Thread are independent of code program whereas task is associated with a certain program. Therefore, in my example, when the JVM assigns a thread to execute of the Callable tasks, if the consumer is instantiated first, then the task will block on take(). Once the JVM discovers that the task is blocked, it will release the thread (or as I understand it but it is not releasing it) and places it back to the worker thread pool in preparation for processing a runnable task (which in this case are the Producers). Consequently, at the end of instantiating all the Callable's, there should be 40 tasks but only 5 threads; 20 of those tasks are blocked, 5 of the tasks should be running and 15 should be waiting (to run).

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In this code the consumers will block until each one dequeues a "0" entry. –  Lawrence Dol Jul 21 '11 at 0:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you misunderstand how threads and threadpools work. A threadpool typically has a work item queue which contains items to be worked on (in your case Callable<>s).

It also contains a (maximum) number of threads (in your case 5) which can work on those items.

The lifetime of an active thread is defined by the code it executes - usually a method. The thread becomes "alive" when it starts executing the method and it ends when it returns. If the method blocks to wait on some signal it does not mean the the thread can go away and execute some other method - that's not how threads work. Instead the thread will be blocked until it can continue execution and enable other threads to be run.

The method which is run by a threadpool thread usually looks like this:

void threadloop()
{
    while (!quit)
    {
        Callable<T> item = null;
        synchronized (workQueue)
        {
            if (workQueue.Count == 0)
                workQueue.wait();

            // we could have been woken up for some other reason so check again
            if (workQueue.Count > 0)
                item = workQueue.pop();
        }
        if (item != null)
             item.Call();
    }
}

This is more or less pseudo code (I'm not a Java developer) but it should show the concept. Now item.Call() executes the method which is supplied by the user of the pool. If that method blocks, then what happens? Well - the thread will be blocked in its execution of item.Call() until the method wakes up again. It can't just go away and execute some other code arbitrarily.

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I don't know what exactly you mean by release thread but once you block on take() the calling thread is blocked and is not going back to the pool.

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From javadoc:

Retrieves and removes the head of this queue, waiting if no elements are present on this queue.

It will wait: you're running in main, so it will stay there.

EDIT: correction: the blocking still happens (in the thread pool threads, not in main). There is no yielding going on: the 20 threads are blocked on the take calls, so no put calls execute, so the Futures never complete, so the program hangs.

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No, it looks like he is submitting the consumers to an executor. –  Lawrence Dol Jul 21 '11 at 0:21
    
Correct, but same issue remains: the take calls block whatever thread they run in. In this case he has 20 take calls blocking 20 threads: the put calls never actually run, so the Futures never actually get completed, so it hangs. –  Femi Jul 21 '11 at 0:29
    
First, thank you. Second, I have update the code. As I mentioned above, if I swap the instantiation of the producer and consumer, it will hang. –  jabawaba Jul 21 '11 at 0:35
1  
If you call put before take everything works as expected: no surprises there, as all the take calls will succeed. If you call take before put then it will hang: the take calls MUST block, as there is no yield concept implemented. take is EXPLICITLY blocking, as the javadoc says. Since all 20 threads are waiting, there are no threads to service the put calls, so nothing ever gets added to the queue, so none of the take calls ever succeed, so it hangs forever. –  Femi Jul 21 '11 at 0:38
    
As long as there are less threads than take calls, this will block. If you make the THREAD_COUNT one more than the number of take calls, it will succeed. –  Femi Jul 21 '11 at 0:39

I think you've misunderstood what gets "blocked" in a BlockingQueue.

The call to queue.take() blocks the thread that invoked it until something is available in the queue. This means that the thread will wait there endlessly, unless interrupted, until an item is added to the queue.

The second code sample hangs the problem because you are adding 20 tasks to wait for an item to appear in the BlockingQueue, and the executor has just 5 threads in it - thus the first five tasks cause all five of the threads to block. This executor is filled with 15 further consumer tasks.

The addition of tasks in the second for-loop to add items to the queue results in 20 tasks that can never be executed, because all threads in the executor are stuck waiting.

So when you say this:

According to my understanding, take() causes the thread to be released even though the task itself is blocked on take().

You have a misunderstanding because there is no difference here between what the "thread" does and what the "task" does. A thread cannot be "released" while the task is blocked - it is the thread that runs the task. When the thread encounters a blocking call to take(), the thread is blocked, period.

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I agree that is what I am witnessing, but if that is how the JVM developers did it, it would be a nightmare to develop multi-threading code because then I would have to submit the Callable's in a certain order (depending on whether I know they are ready to run or will be blocked), otherwise, the program will hang. That sounds horrible –  jabawaba Jul 21 '11 at 0:45
    
Well, the JDK also offers non-blocking queues as well. You are correct though that (in most languages) multi-threaded code can be a pain for reasons along these lines. –  matt b Jul 21 '11 at 1:18

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