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Ok First have all i'm sorry for my poor english :) Now for my problem

I'm trying to create a Script file with multiple choices and I ran into a problem. If I don't enter an input (just press enter) the file displays an error and shuts down. now My question is whether there is a command that will force the file to go back to the Start in case where no input is entered?

This relevant part of my script

:input
@echo off
CLS
ECHO   #############################################
ECHO   #                                           #
ECHO   #  1 - Make A System Folder or File         #
ECHO   #  2 - Restore Folder or File               #
Echo   #  3 - Exit                                 #
ECHO   #                                           #
ECHO   #############################################

SET /P O=Set Your Choice And Press Enter:
ECHO Loading .........
(
IF %O%==1 GOTO Hide
IF %O%==2 GOTO Show
IF %O%==3 GOTO Exit
IF %O%=="" GOTO input
) 
ELSE (
    GOTO input
)

As you can see I tried to use "Else" but it works only partially. If I enter a variable that is not part of the list given (in my case 1, 2, 3) the File gose back to the beginning, and even if i send non input request afterword the file keep working properly. The problem is very specific, Only when the first input is a non input the problem Occurs. in any other situation the script works fine

Thank you and Again I'm very sorry for my poor English :)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. Always reset variable before input. When user just presses enter variable doesn't reset automatically.

    :: Delete variable %O%
    SET "O="
    SET /P "O=Set Your Choice And Press Enter: "
    
  2. Always take the variables in quotes (in IF)

    IF "%O%"=="1" GOTO Hide
    IF "%O%"=="2" GOTO Show
    IF "%O%"=="3" GOTO Exit
    
  3. GOTO Label never returns back (exception - goto :label in some crazy cases). In your case you can write:

    IF "%O%"=="1" GOTO Hide
    IF "%O%"=="2" GOTO Show
    IF "%O%"=="3" GOTO Exit
    
    GOTO INPUT
    
  4. Add after each 'procedure' command exit /B to prevent crazy parsing after code changing. Warning: goto command doesn't work like void in C++, so command exit /B will stop script. But if you are using call :label command exit /B will stop code only under :label.

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+1 for actually solving the problem, though I might disagree with some parts of your answer (like "goto :label" in some crazy cases – what did you mean by that?). Also, putting exit /b like that is absolutely redundant (and you never explain why you put it there). –  Andriy M Jul 21 '11 at 6:50
    
When I started programming minesweeper on batch-files I collided with some bugs like that I described. When I replaced all "goto :label" on "goto label" bugs dissapeared. Very strange. –  nsinreal Jul 21 '11 at 7:11
    
About command "exit /b" - this is good style to write 'exit /b' (or goto:eof) to prevent next parsing on changing code –  nsinreal Jul 21 '11 at 7:14
    
Re "goto :label" – I see now, thanks, I thought you meant something else. I never use goto :label except for the special case of goto :eof, so I didn't know about those things. –  Andriy M Jul 21 '11 at 7:26
    
Re "exit /b" – the style point is a good one, maybe even worth adding it to the answer. It's just that in this particular case the exit /b command can never be reached. Also, the OP has explicitly said that this is only part of the script, and you could guess that by the presence of the GOTOs and the absence of the respective labels. So, again, putting the exit command like that without an explanation can be confusing. Thanks for clarifying, anyway. –  Andriy M Jul 21 '11 at 7:27

The parenthesis are not necessary. Try this,

:input
@echo off
CLS
ECHO   #############################################
ECHO   #                                           #
ECHO   #  1 - Make A System Folder or File         #
ECHO   #  2 - Restore Folder or File               #
Echo   #  3 - Exit                                 #
ECHO   #                                           #
ECHO   #############################################

SET /P O=Set Your Choice And Press Enter:
ECHO Loading .........
IF %O%==1 GOTO Hide
IF %O%==2 GOTO Show
IF %O%==3 GOTO Exit
IF %O%=="" GOTO input

ELSE 
GOTO input

As a side note your English is very good!

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Yeah, if you want to go to the :start or :anything in case of no input, a solution is write the following:

this first line is the key

set num=""

set /P num=%input%

if %num%==1 goto Choice1
if %num%==2 goto Choice2

if "%num%"=="" goto Start

goto Start

This last line is for inputs outside of your range of choice (in this example, 3 would be invalid and go to the Start again

There is a better and easier solution though!

This is just a "more professional" solution to multiple choice menus, and it is REALLY useful...

Instead of setting %input% and all that jazz, just use choice! If you enter a value outside of the range (123 means you can choose 1 or 2 or 3), there will be "beep" that means invalid entry.

set errorlevel=   

CHOICE /C 123  >nul
if %errorlevel%==1 goto Choice1
if %errorlevel%==2 goto Choice2
if %errorlevel%==3 goto Choice3

And that is it! So much easier, right? So just to explain what the lines mean...

The first line just sets the errorlevel to blank, because when you get more advanced, the errorlevel may be assigned a value unexpectedly. So just save yourself a headache later and erase it.

The >nul "hides" the fact that it's a choice. Just put an echo message above it to say "Press number X for Choice X". I love this because you don't need to press enter afterwards- saving time if you have lots of choices

Now, the errorlevel is not assigned your input...so watch out!

My choices could be "CHOICE /C 3689 >nul ", but the errorlevel output is still errorlevel=1 for entering 3, errorlevel=2 for entering 6, and so on.

So if you have an option to go back to the main menu by pressing 0, and CHOICE /C 0123, pressing zero will be errorlevel=1, pressing 1 will be errorlevel=2... etc.

Choice is super useful, just go and type choice /? for more details.

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