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I keep on getting Null exception. I instantiated myHello inside program and still it gives me this error. Thanks in advance.

class Hello
{
    public Dictionary<int, string> one;
    public Dictionary<int, ushort> two;
    public Dictionary<int, bool> three;

    public Hello()
    {
        this.one = new Dictionary<int, string>();
        this.two = new Dictionary<int, ushort>();
        this.three = new Dictionary<int, bool>();
    }

    public Dictionary<int, object> Values
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public object this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return this.Values[index];
        }
        set
        {
            this.Values[index] = value;
        }
    }
}




class Program
{
    public static void myfun(ref Hello hu)
    {
        hu[0] = "Hello";
        hu[1] = 25;
        hu[2] = true;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            //Program myprog = new Program();
            var myHello = new Hello[2];
            myHello[0] = new Hello();
            myHello[1] = new Hello();

            myHello[1][1] = 2;
            myfun(ref myHello[1]);
            Console.WriteLine("" + (Hello)(myHello[1])[1]);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
        catch (NullReferenceException ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Values is never assigned a default value and I think you are trying to access Values property before assigning a value.

Change your constructor to:

public Hello()
{
    this.one = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    this.two = new Dictionary<int, ushort>();
    this.three = new Dictionary<int, bool>();
    this.Values = new Dictionary<int, object>();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, you got it. It's working like a breeze now. And I changed "(Hello)(myHello[1])[1])" to "myHello[1][1]", since it gave me some casting error. Thanks once again! –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 4:09

you need to implement get and set here:

 public Dictionary<int, object> Values
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
That is still fine. It is a feature (automatic properties) added in C# 3.0 –  Chandu Jul 21 '11 at 4:03
1  
I understand that but it return null which explains what the OP describes... either he assign something to Values in the constructor or implements this to map get/set to one of the already defined Dictionaries... –  Yahia Jul 21 '11 at 4:04
    
You know what, you could be onto something here. The asker is doing something not entirely obvious or sensible. –  Anthony Pegram Jul 21 '11 at 4:06
    
Can anyone say how to implement them? It runs without implementing them, but to be safe and learn more about it I wish to know how I would do it. –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 4:12
    
Sorry Anthony for not explaining it properly, I was creating an object with properties that are Dictionaries and passing this object to a function to modify it, this was my intention. But this program is used in a whole different place with these concepts needed to be implemented. –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 4:17

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