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I would like to create a button whose size is that of it's largest edge.

The reason for this is I want the button to be a small information circle embedded inside a DataGrid column.

Currently I have:

<DataGridTemplateColumn>
    <DataGridTemplateColumn.CellTemplate>
        <DataTemplate>
            <Button Content="i" Padding="2" Margin="0"
                    VerticalAlignment="Center"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                    Width="{Binding Source=Self, Path=Height}">
                <Button.Template>
                    <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type Button}">
                        <Grid>
                            <Ellipse Fill="#FFF4F4F5" Stroke="#FF6695EB"/>
                            <ContentPresenter Margin="0"
                                              RecognizesAccessKey="False"
                                              SnapsToDevicePixels="True"
                                              VerticalAlignment="Center"
                                              HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                                              />
                        </Grid>
                    </ControlTemplate>
                </Button.Template>
            </Button>
        </DataTemplate>
    </DataGridTemplateColumn.CellTemplate>
</DataGridTemplateColumn>
share|improve this question
    
If you are hardcoding either the Width or Height in xaml you may as well hardcode both of them (and avoid having to override any methods). The solution I posted below doesn't need hardcoded values as it overrides the Measuring of the Button. – Rob Jul 21 '11 at 5:23
    
Thanks Rob, yeah, I didn't want to hard-code anything, seeing your solution right after editing I've decided to add both overrides to the class, that way it works both for no sizes and for when a single size has been set. – Brett Ryan Jul 21 '11 at 5:25
    
If you want the ability to optionally hardcode either Width/Height then I would suggest adding those additional checks into MeasureOverride rather than using OnPropertyChanged – Rob Jul 21 '11 at 5:37
    
Thanks Rob, will do, though for my main use I don't want to specify either, your solution works fine as is :) – Brett Ryan Jul 21 '11 at 5:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create a class derived from Button and override the Measuring, e.g.

public class SquareButton : Button
{
    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size constraint)
    {
        Size size = base.MeasureOverride(constraint);
        size.Height = size.Width = Math.Max(size.Height, size.Width);
        return size;
    }
}

You can then use it something like this:

<local:SquareButton 
    Content="i" Padding="2" Margin="0"
    VerticalAlignment="Center"
    HorizontalAlignment="Center">
    <local:SquareButton.Template>
        <ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type Button}">
            <Grid>
                <Ellipse Fill="#FFF4F4F5" Stroke="#FF6695EB"/>
                <ContentPresenter Margin="0"
                    RecognizesAccessKey="False"
                    SnapsToDevicePixels="True"
                    VerticalAlignment="Center"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                    />
            </Grid>
        </ControlTemplate>
    </local:SquareButton.Template>
</local:SquareButton>
share|improve this answer

Make a custom control - SquareButton

public class SquareButton : Button
{
    protected override void OnPropertyChanged(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.Property == HeightProperty || e.Property == WidthProperty)
            this.Height = this.Width = Math.Max(this.Width, this.Height);

        base.OnPropertyChanged(e);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this DerinDavis, the problem with this however is it requires at least one size to be specified. – Brett Ryan Jul 21 '11 at 5:26

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