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I have written this method for converting a date time zone. How do i reduce the execution time of this method further.

public static Timestamp convertTimeZone(final Timestamp fromDate, final TimeZone fromTZ, final TimeZone toTZ ){
   Long timeInDate  =  fromDate.getTime() ;
   int fromOffset = fromTZ.getOffset(timeInDate);
   int toOffset = toTZ.getOffset(timeInDate);
   Timestamp dateStamp = new Timestamp(fromDate.getTime());

   if (fromOffset >= 0){
      int diff = 0;

      if (toOffset > 0){
          diff = (fromOffset - toOffset);
      } else {
          diff = (fromOffset + Math.abs(toOffset));
      }

      long date = fromDate.getTime() - diff;
      dateStamp.setTime(date);
   } else {
      int diff = 0;

      if (toOffset > 0){
          diff = (Math.abs( fromOffset) + toOffset);
      } else {
          diff = (Math.abs( fromOffset) - Math.abs(toOffset));
      }

      long date = fromDate.getTime() + diff;
      dateStamp.setTime(date);
   }

   return dateStamp;
}
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It is O(1), what do you mean 'execution time' ? –  Bozho Jul 21 '11 at 5:47
    
This should really be in codereview.stackexchange.com not here. –  Shahzeb Jul 21 '11 at 5:59
    
I need to improve the time taken to convert the timezone. –  leftrright Jul 21 '11 at 6:00
    
I won't get any timezone information from mysql on retrieving.so converting manually. –  leftrright Jul 21 '11 at 12:05
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3 Answers 3

With joda-time it may look like this:

DateTime dt = new DateTime(DateTimeZone.forID("GMT"));
System.out.println(dt); // 5 am
dt = dt.withZone(DateTimeZone.forID("EET"));
System.out.println(dt); // 8 am

Note that Timestamp has no notion of Timezone so it is not suitable for representing it.

Your solution will have a good running time, since it's O(1). It's harder to read though.

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+1 for introducing joda-time (not that you need any more points) –  Shahzeb Jul 21 '11 at 5:57
    
The code got cut off. Can you add the rest? You could also mention the concept of LocalDate as it might help the OP. I always feel bad when I see programmers stuck with plain ol' Java dates and calendars and timestamps. –  Ray Toal Jul 21 '11 at 6:04
    
sorry, that was redundant line. As I noted on the next line - you can't get good tz representation in Timestamp (unless you set a different date, as the OP is doing, which is not entirely good) –  Bozho Jul 21 '11 at 6:06
    
Yes, there is a problem in tz representation which i am not interested, what i need is a faster implementation –  leftrright Jul 21 '11 at 6:18
    
@leftrright your implementation is fast enough. –  Bozho Jul 21 '11 at 13:33
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You could store your date in a Calendar object to begin with. Showing it in different time zone formats will be a matter of configuration that you apply to a SimpleDateFormat.

Technically a Date is the same in all time zones (it's internal value is the same). Applying the concept of timezones allows date formatters to adjust offsets for display. In other words, a Date that represents 17:00 in London time is equal to a Date that represents 12:00 in New York. Displaying it in the GMT vs. the EST time zones can be a function of date formatters.

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It's not quite an answer, but I recommend always store timestamp in database as UTC time instead of local time. And display it for different timezones only on presentation layer setting DateFormat.setTimeZone()

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