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If I want to define a value only if it is not defined, I do something like this :

#ifndef THING
#define THING OTHER_THING
#endif

What if THING is a typedef'd identifier, and not defined? I would like to do something like this:

#ifntypedef thing_type
typedef uint32_t thing_type
#endif

The issue arose because I wanted to check to see if an external library has already defined the boolean type, but I'd be open to hearing a more general solution.

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3  
no there is not –  Hayri Uğur Koltuk Jul 21 '11 at 7:50
2  
... (adding to @Ali Veli comment) and you don't want it to be. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 21 '11 at 8:12
3  
@ZachRattner: Just for your information, if your compiler MSVC, __if_not_exists is available in C++. For example, a code like __if_not_exists( thing_type ) { typedef uint32_t thing_type; } is possible. –  Ise Wisteria Jul 21 '11 at 8:32

10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No there is no such facility in C++ at preprocessing stage. At the max can do is

#ifndef thing_type
#define thing_type uint32_t 
#endif

Though this is not a good coding practice and I don't suggest it.

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5  
I did not downvote, but I prefer when people tell me what is wrong with an answer rather than just a downvote. The problem with this approach is that typedef creates a real alias to the type, while a macro is only text substitution. In the example it does not matter, but the semantics of void foo( const X x ) are very different depending on whether X is a typedef or the macro above: typedef int* X will make the function void foo( int * const ), while #define X int* will make it void foo( int const * ) (darn const on the leftmost side!) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 21 '11 at 8:05
    
defines != typedefs. Actually, defines < typedefs. Bad coding practice. –  DevSolar Jul 21 '11 at 8:05
    
@DevSolar, I don't endorse this technique; this is one of the way. –  iammilind Jul 21 '11 at 9:24
    
@Zach, thanks for putting trust! :) –  iammilind Jul 21 '11 at 16:06

There is no such thing in the language, nor is it needed. Within a single project you should not have the same typedef alias referring to different types ever, as that is a violation of the ODR, and if you are going to create the same alias for the same type then just do it. The language allows you to perform the same typedef as many times as you wish and will usually catch that particular ODR (within the same translation unit):

typedef int myint;
typedef int myint;       // OK: myint is still an alias to int
//typedef double myint;  // Error: myint already defined as alias to int

If what you are intending to do is implementing a piece of functionality for different types by using a typedef to determine which to use, then you should be looking at templates rather than typedefs.

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C++ does not provide any mechanism for code to test presence of typedef, the best you can have is something like this:

#ifndef THING_TYPE_DEFINED
#define THING_TYPE_DEFINED
typedef uint32_t thing_type 
#endif

EDIT:
As @David, is correct in his comment, this answers the how? part but importantly misses the why? It can be done in the way above, If you want to do it et all, but important it you probably don't need to do it anyways, @David's answer & comment explains the details, and I think that answers the question correctly.

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7  
That is ugly and useless. The important question is not how to do this, but why would you do it? And the answer is you shouldn't. A typedef can be redefined as many times as you wish (provided that it always aliases the same type) within the same translation unit so that is not a problem. Defining it to alias different types in different translation units of the same program is a violation of the ODR, so you don't want that either. The best you can get is nothing if the alias is always the same, or hiding an error at compile time depending on what was included before. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 21 '11 at 8:10
    
@David Rodríguez - dribeas: I agree, I think I missed out one why? and just jumped on to the how? part of it. I am going to add a note on the same. –  Alok Save Jul 21 '11 at 8:23

Preprocessor directives (like #define) are crude text replacement tools, which know nothing about the programming language, so they can't act on any language-level definitions.

There are two approaches to making sure a type is only defined once:

  • Structure the code so that each definition has its place, and there's no need for multiple definitions
  • #define a preprocessor macro alongside the type, and use #ifndef to check for the macro definition before defining the type.

The first option will generally lead to more maintainable code. The second could cause subtle bugs, if you accidentally end up with different definitions of the type within one program.

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As other have already said, there are no such thing, but if you try to create an alias to different type, you'll get a compilation error :

typedef int myInt;
typedef int myInt;    // ok, same alias
typedef float myInt;  // error

However, there is a thing called ctag for finding where a typedef is defined.

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As mentioned before this is not included in the C++ standard, but you might be able to use autotools to get the same functionality.

You could use the ac_cxx_bool macro to make sure bool is defined (or different routines for different datatypes).

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It is not transparent but you can try to compile it one time without typedef (just using the alias), and see if it compiles or not.

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The solution I ended up using was including stdbool.h. I know this doesn't solve the question of how to check if a typedef is already defined, but it does let me ensure that the boolean type is defined.

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This might not directly answer the question, but serve as a possible solution to your problem.

Why not try something like this?

#define DEFAULT_TYPE int // just for argument's sake
#ifndef MY_COOL_TYPE
     #define MY_COOL_TYPE DEFAULT_TYPE
#endif
typdef MY_COOL_TYPE My_Cool_Datatype_t;

Then if you want to customize the type, you can either define MY_COOL_TYPE somewhere above this (like in a "configure" header that is included at the top of this header) or pass it as a command line argument when compiling (as far as I know you can do this with GCC and LLVM, maybe others, too).

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Without having to use a macro you can determine whether a namespace-scope typedef is defined by checking whether compiling fails. If it is a typedef nested in a structure SFINAE can be used.

For namespace-scope typedef you can do both at the same time:

typedef int some_type
#define some_type some_type

And then:

#ifdef some_type
    some_type some_var;
#endif

That is some_type is both a preprocessor macro and a typedef.

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