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             use strict;
             use warnings;
             open(FILE4,"cool.txt");
             open(FILE6,">./mool.txt");
             $line = <FILE4>;
               while ($line ne "")
             {
                @array = split(/,/,$line);
                $line = <FILE4> ;
                print FILE6 ($array[0]);
                print FILE6 ("\t");
                print FILE6 ($array[1]);
                print FILE6 ("\t");
                print FILE6 ($array[2]);
             }

These is the code I have written in perl. But the code is not working fine. Its giving tab space for every nextline. But i dont need that TAB space for every new line.Let me show you how the output is.

          name         contact        email
                       samy            32344245            hyte@some.com
                       alex            231414124           coool@some.com   

This is how i see my mool.txt file.The first line its working fine.But from the nextline I'm facing tab space.I am trying to find out where the bug is.Can anyone please let me know where the code is going wrong?I have gone through it so many times but unable to figure it out.Thank you

As someone asked im showing you the input file

        "name","contact","email"
        "samy","32344245","hyte@some.com"
share|improve this question
    
please show us the first two lines of your input file – Karoly Horvath Jul 21 '11 at 8:13
3  
You might run into problems if your data becomes any more complex. For example, how would you handle a comma in the name or contact field? You might want to look at a CSV module such as Text::CSV or similar. – Mike Jul 21 '11 at 9:08
    
That file has a tab character before the data? :) – Diego Sevilla Jul 21 '11 at 10:29
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Put this statement inside the while loop. chomp This should be the first line after reading a line from a file. This will remove unwanted spaces.

use strict;
use warnings;
open(FILE4,"cool.txt");
open(FILE6,">./mool.txt");

while (<FILE4>)
{
     chomp; #This will remove unwanted spaces
     @array = split(/,/,$_); #$_ will represent the line which is read
     print FILE6 ($array[0]);
     print FILE6 ("\t");
     print FILE6 ($array[1]);
     print FILE6 ("\t");
     print FILE6 ($array[2]);
     print FILE6 ("\n");
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
chomp won't remove any trailing tabs from a string, unless you update $/. – eugene y Jul 21 '11 at 10:06
    
@eugene Check this code snippet & output #! /usr/bin/perl $x = <STDIN>; print "Without chomp: |$x|"; chomp($x); print "\nAfter chomp: |$x|"; Output [tethomas@~/perl-training]./t.pl Hello Without chomp: |Hello | After chomp: |Hello| – cppcoder Jul 21 '11 at 11:18
    
@cpp eugene is right, from perldoc perlfunc This safer version of chop removes any trailing string that corresponds to the current value of $/ (also known as $INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR ...) – TLP Jul 21 '11 at 12:30

You probably have whitespace at the beginning/end of lines in the input file.
Try stripping it with s///:

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $in, "<", "cool.txt" or die $!;
open my $out, ">", "mool.txt" or die $!;

while (my $line = <$in>) {
    $line =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g;                    
    my @array = split(/,/, $line);
    print $out join("\t", @array), "\n";
}     
share|improve this answer
    
Please use three-argument open. By the way, why is the syntax highlighting failing here again? – Svante Jul 21 '11 at 8:47
    
I second the three-argument form of open. Also, one should always check the return value from opening a file. – eugene y Jul 21 '11 at 11:13

What you seem to be doing is changing this file from comma-delimited to a tab-delimited. If so, this might be an easier way to do it:

while (<>) {
    s/,/\t/g;
    print;
}

And then use it like this:

$ script.pl cool.txt > mool.txt

You might even get away with a one-liner:

perl -pwe 's/,/\t/g' cool.txt > mool.txt

Or if you have weird whitespace:

perl -pwe 's/^\s+|\s+$//g; s/,/\t/g' cool.txt > mool.txt

Or, a safer version, using Text::CSV. This will handle complex data and such for you. If you get blank output, it may be your extra whitespace messing things up. If so, you can run the one-liner above without the s/,/\t/g line to get a "cleaned-up" version of the input file:

perl -pwe 's/^\s+|\s+$//g;' cool.txt > cool_clean.txt

Script:

use warnings;
use strict;
use Text::CSV;
use autodie;

my $csv_in = Text::CSV->new();
my $csv_out = Text::CSV->new( { sep_char => "\t", eol => "\n" } );
open my $fh, '<', 'data.csv';
open my $out, '>', 'mool.txt';
while (my $row = $csv_in->getline($fh)) {
    $csv_out->print($out, $row);
}
share|improve this answer

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