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AFAIK staging deployments are intended for testing Azure roles which implies that I could deploy a role with errors in code into staging. If that error damages my data I could be screwed.

How do I address that? I can't stage a role without reasonable data (hard to test it) and I can't let an unstable role damage the data.

Do I have to maintain a separate dataset for staging? How is this problem typically solved?

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AFAIK staging deployments are intended for testing Azure roles which implies that I could deploy a role with errors in code into staging. If that error damages my data I could be screwed.

Staging is really designed to be a place for deployment - for spinning up new role instances prior to the instant virtual IP address swap. While you can do some testing there - e.g. making some final checks that your deployment is valid - it's not really there to allow you to do lots of testing.

How do I address that? I can't stage a role without reasonable data (hard to test it) and I can't let an unstable role damage the data.

I've generally tested on a development environment with fake data or deployed as a separate Azure service with fake data. However, I admit this has never been in the situation where I've needed huge amounts of data for testing - generally these tests have been test deployments with just 1 or 2 users.

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Staging, as an environmentis meant to acurately simulate your production environment, including the data.

We have the following strategy: production is production, staging is connected to the same DB as staging, because the updates in Azure work the way they do; meaning I want to be able to upgrade my staging deployment, give the client a chance to verify again, and then swap the VIPs for the deployments, thus transitioning the application seamlessly. For those times, when there are breaking changes in the database, we decided to either create a new deployment alltogether, or turn-off the production one, giving users a maintenance notice.

Ultimately it's whatever you decide. But again, bearing in mind what Azure's staging is, I'd suggest keeping the data real, and consider it a beta access "program". Unless of course you have other requirements. But that's besides the point.

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