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#! /usr/bin/perl 
@no = (1 .. 20000); 
foreach(@no) { 
print "<div id=\"world@no\" onclick=\"javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()\">&nbsp;</div>\n"; 
} 

This is my perl script but how do I get it to re-write the sentence with a new variable each time?

i.e how do i get it to output

<div id="world1" onclick="javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()">&nbsp;</div>
.
.
.
<div id="world20000" onclick="javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()">&nbsp;</div>
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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The @ in the print statement is confusing the interpreter. Also, it isn't what you want, since print "@no" would print out the same thing as join(' ',@no). Instead, you want to interpolate each element of @no into the string that's printed out:

#! /usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings; #Always use these!
my @no = (1 .. 20000); 
foreach(@no) { 
print "<div id=\"world" . $_ . "\" onclick=\"javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()\">&nbsp;</div>\n"; 
} 
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Your main problem is interpolating the whole array into your string instead of the loop variable ($_ in your case since you didn't specify one, but I prefer to give it a name).

You can avoid needing to escape the "s by using a different delimiter for your string:

use strict;
use warnings;
for my $world_no (1..20000) {
    print qq!<div id="world$world_no" onclick="showDiv_postscreen(); hideDiv_welcomebuttons()">&nbsp;</div>\n!;
}

Also, the "javascript:" is only necessary for things like <a href="..."> where a url is expected and you want to supply javascript code instead. It's not needed for onclick, certainly not twice.

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At least one answer makes like easier. We need those backslashes so don't waste them. :) –  brian d foy Jul 21 '11 at 19:24
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#!/usr/bin/perl 
my @no = (1 .. 20000); 
foreach my $i (@no) { 
    print "<div id=\"world$i\" onclick=\"javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()\">&nbsp;</div>\n"; 
}
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Why not just use: foreach my $i (1 .. 20_000), otherwise you are loosing memory to prelocate the array size –  Dimitar Petrov Jul 21 '11 at 10:28
    
@Dimi Or for (my $i = 1; $i <= 20_000; $i++) to avoid loading any memory. ;) Or a while loop, like in my answer. –  TLP Jul 21 '11 at 12:27
    
This is the example, in real program array may be created some other way, not every number. –  Alexandr Ciornii Jul 21 '11 at 12:35
    
@TLP: That's also a solution, however I just dont like that syntax ;) Alexandr: My point was that you don't need to create the array at all, because you allocate memory for 20_000 elements. –  Dimitar Petrov Jul 21 '11 at 12:39
    
TLP: for(;;) doesn't save any memory over for(..) –  ysth Jul 21 '11 at 19:30
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#! /usr/bin/perl
@no = (1 .. 20);
foreach $x (@no) {
print "<div id=\"world$x\" onclick=\"javascript:showDiv_postscreen()\;javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()\">&nbsp;</div>\n";
}
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I would consider using a variable to count, instead of defining a range. It may feel less intuitive, but it is not.

Also, instead of escaping the double quotes (\"), you can use qq(), which is equivalent.

my $i = 1;
print qq(<div id="world$i" onclick="javascript:showDiv_postscreen(); javascript:hideDiv_welcomebuttons()">&nbsp;</div>\n) while ($i++ <= 20_000);
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