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Trying to build Wireshark from source as there is no Linux installer and I am getting this error when I run the configure script:

checking for GTK+ - version >= 2.4.0... no
*** Could not run GTK+ test program, checking why...
*** The test program failed to compile or link. See the file config.log for the
*** exact error that occured. This usually means GTK+ is incorrectly installed.
configure: error: GTK+ 2.4 or later isn't available, so Wireshark can't be compiled

Tried running the following commands with no luck:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

Can anyone help me as to how to do this?

Thanks in advance.

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Hi guys, thanks for the comments. I've already tried using apt-get but it reports that it couldn't find the package gtk. –  SutureSelf Jul 21 '11 at 11:28
2  
why can't you just do sudo apt-get install wireshark? –  Dan D. Jul 21 '11 at 11:30
1  
Lol, I literally just did that. Worked a treat. Thanks! –  SutureSelf Jul 21 '11 at 12:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This worked for me: apt-get install libgtk2.0-dev

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The two commands you mention do not state what application you want to update. The actual command is actually apt-get appname install

In any case I suggest you use the GUI Software Update Manager for this.

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Try to use sudo apt-get install gtk+2.4

sudo apt-get upgrade actually upgrades just already installed packets:

Packages currently installed with new versions available are retrieved and upgraded; under no circumstances are currently installed packages removed, or packages not already installed retrieved and installed.
(from man page)

but before upgrade you have to issue update command in order to invalidate your local information about available packages and to get all latest changes from repos enlisted in /etc/apt/sources.list.
That's because package system uses it's own local package index to track dependencies when you using apt-get.

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