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I'm developing an Android application and I just ran into something. I have some anonymous classes (event listeners). They are parameterized from the database. What I did is this:

buttonA.setOnTouchListener(new View.OnTouchListener() {
                        private Boolean isActive = null;
                        private boolean isTrigger;
                        private int onLevel;
                        private int offLevel;
                        private int chIdx;

                        @Override
                        public boolean onTouch(View v, MotionEvent event) {
                            if (isActive == null) {
                                Cursor btnSettings = dbHelper.getButtonsTable().fetchButton(1, profileId, currentMode);
                                ...
...
                            }
                            return true;
                        }

Is it considered a good practice to use the Boolean object as a trilean switch (it has a null value if the listener haven't been parameterized yet) or I should use two boolean variables...or maybe an integer?

Do you have and ideas?

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1  
Boolean holding a null could be an example of a Detonator Pattern from Resign Patterns fuzz-box.blogspot.com/2011/05/resign-patterns.html –  Tadeusz Kopec Jul 21 '11 at 13:19
1  
I'm not familiar with Android, but you seem to be calling a database fetch from the GUI event thread, which could cause your interface to become irresponsive. –  toto2 Jul 21 '11 at 13:34
    
This is just a prototype to spare code, but thanks for the notice! –  Adam Arold Jul 22 '11 at 8:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Best yet, use an type (probably an enum) with accurate descriptions of the three states. Booleans don't give a lot of information to the person who is calling the function (especially when used as a tristate).

public enum ActiveStatus {
  On,
  Off,
  Unknown
}
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Excellent answer, thanks! I don't know why it did not come to my mind.. –  Adam Arold Jul 22 '11 at 7:59
    
This is also the recommended method in Effective Java 2nd Edition. Note that enum constants are normally in uppercase. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jun 4 at 15:46

I would say either use Boolean with true, false and null or use an enum. I tend to use a Boolean being null as a kind of "don't know yet". If you are using null as something more meaningful than "don't know" you are probably semantically better off going with an enum.

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I would have agreed, but found out how dangerous this use of null in Booleans is. Because of automatic unboxing you tend to forget too quickly about this thrid state and use it in boolean (with lowercase b) situations where you easily end up with a NullPointerException. Better use Enum! –  Zordid Sep 8 '11 at 8:26
    
Or if you really must, use Optional<Boolean> in Java 8, but enums are still better. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jun 4 at 15:47

Here we have to use a variable to represent any of the three status values: ON, OFF, or UNKNOWN. We also know that the variable cannot take any value other than these three values. So, we can say that those three values are the range of values that the status variable can mapped to. When we think about other data types such as int, char, et., they also have predefined range of values. Therefore, in this case we need to create a custom data type with those three values as its range. Enumerations are used in these kind of scenarios and can be defined as Jeff Foster written:

public enum ActiveState {
    ON, OFF, UNKNOWN
}
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null is not "unspecified value", it's "no value at all" for any object type -- including Boolean. Hence you still have only two meaningful values when using Boolean object.

You should either use more than one boolean flag or an enum.

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It is considered a good practice by me.

Your data type is true or false or unspecified, nullable Boolean fits perfectly.

share|improve this answer
    
I would have agreed, but found out how dangerous this use of null in Booleans is. Because of automatic unboxing you tend to forget too quickly about this thrid state and use it in boolean (with lowercase b) situations where you easily end up with a NullPointerException. Better use Enum! –  Zordid Sep 8 '11 at 8:26

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