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Here is an algorithm in Java:

public String getHash(String password, String salt) throws Exception {
    String input = password + salt;
    MessageDigest md = MessageDigest.getInstance(SHA-512);
    byte[] out = md.digest(input.getBytes());
    return HexEncoder.toHex(out);
}

Assume the salt is known. I want to know the time to brute force for when the password is a dictionary word and also when it is not a dictionary word.

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6  
Could be a minute or a week. Depends on the password, the salt, the machine that is used to brute-force and the algorithm implementation. –  Cat Plus Plus Jul 21 '11 at 12:31
    
Salt is 20 bytes. Assume a work station. Algoritm is provided already. –  timothyjc Jul 21 '11 at 13:41
    
Much more heavily optimised algorithms are used for brute-forcing. And more and more GPUs. –  Cat Plus Plus Jul 21 '11 at 14:00
    
Do you mean the algorithm for cracking the hash? You could use any algorithm you want. I know that it could be done on GPUs but I am really just after a ballpark figure. Whoever answers the question can state their assumptions about why they came up with the number they give. I'm also really curious about the difference between cracking a dictionary based password compared to a random one. Also I want to know how you calculate how long it takes to crack it :) –  timothyjc Jul 21 '11 at 14:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 49 down vote accepted

In your case, breaking the hash algorithm is equivalent to finding a collision in the hash algorithm. That means you don't need to find the password itself (which would be a preimage attack), you just need to find an output of the hash function that is equal to the hash of a valid password (thus "collision"). Finding a collision using a birthday attack takes O(2^n/2) time, where n is the output length of the hash function in bits.

SHA-2 has an output size of 512 bits, so finding a collision would take O(2^256) time. Given there are no clever attacks on the algorithm itself (currently none are known for the SHA-2 hash family) this is what it takes to break the algorithm.

To get a feeling for what 2^256 actually means: currently it is believed that the number of atoms in the (entire!!!) universe is roughly 10^80 which is roughly 2^266. Assuming 32 byte input (which is reasonable for your case - 20 bytes salt + 12 bytes password) my machine takes ~0,22s (~2^-2s) for 65536 (=2^16) computations. So 2^256 computations would be done in 2^240 * 2^16 computations which would take

2^240 * 2^-2 = 2^238 ~ 10^72s ~ 3,17 * 10^64 years

Even calling this millions of years is ridiculous. And it doesn't get much better with the fastest hardware on the planet computing thousands of hashes in parallel. No human technology will be able to crunch this number into something acceptable.

So forget brute-forcing SHA-256 here. Your next question was about dictionary words. To retrieve such weak passwords rainbow tables were used traditionally. A rainbow table is generally just a table of precomputed hash values, the idea is if you were able to precompute and store every possible hash along with its input, then it would take you O(1) to look up a given hash and retrieve a valid preimage for it. Of course this is not possible in practice since there's no storage device that could store such enormous amounts of data. This dilemma is known as memory-time tradeoff. As you are only able to store so many values typical rainbow tables include some form of hash chaining with intermediary reduction functions (this is explained in detail in the Wikipedia article) to save on space by giving up a bit of savings in time.

Salts were a countermeasure to make such rainbow tables infeasible. To discourage attackers from precomputing a table for a specific salt it is recommended to apply per-user salt values. However, since users do not use secure, completely random passwords, it is still surprising how successful you can get if the salt is known and you just iterate over a large dictionary of common passwords in a simple trial and error scheme. The relationship between natural language and randomness is expressed as entropy. Typical password choices are generally of low entropy, whereas completely random values would contain a maximum of entropy.

The low entropy of typical passwords makes it possible that there is a relatively high chance of one of your users using a password from a relatively small database of common passwords. If you google for them, you will end up finding torrent links for such password databases, often in the gigabyte size category. Being successful with such a tool is usually in the range of minutes to days if the attacker is not restricted in any way.

That's why generally hashing and salting alone is not enough, you need to install other safety mechanisms as well. You should use an artificially slowed down entropy-enducing method such as PBKDF2 described in PKCS#5 and you should enforce a waiting period for a given user before they may retry entering their password. A good scheme is to start with 0.5s and then doubling that time for each failed attempt. In most cases users don't notice this and don't fail much more often than three times on average. But it will significantly slow down any malicious outsider trying to attack your application.

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2  
Thanks. Exactly the type of answer I was looking for. –  timothyjc Jul 22 '11 at 14:44
2  
No, collisions don't matter. Finding an input that matches a given hash is a first pre-image, even if it's not the original password. You also wrote SHA-256 once, and saying "SHA-2 has an output size of 512 bits" isn't the best choice of words either. –  CodesInChaos Feb 23 '13 at 19:59
2  
SHA-2 is a family of hash functions. Its not SHA-256. –  AbiusX Apr 1 '13 at 10:46
1  
The first paragraphs of this answer are complete nonsense (and dangerous). You don't need a collision attack to find a preimage of a hash, if this preimage is in a dictionary. (You don't need a rainbow table either, that just helps to do some work before, and to share the work for multiple passwords. As you correctly said, a salt helps here. It doesn't help against a brute force dictionary password search.) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 4 '13 at 20:09

There isn't a single answer to this question as there are too many variables, but SHA2 is not yet really cracked (see: Lifetimes of cryptographic hash functions) so it is still a good algorithm to use to store passwords in. The use of salt is good because it prevents attack from dictionary attacks or rainbow tables. Importance of a salt is that it should be unique for each password. You can use a format like [128-bit salt][512-bit password hash] when storing the hashed passwords.

The only viable way to attack is to actually calculate hashes for different possibilities of password and eventually find the right one by matching the hashes.

To give an idea about how many hashes can be done in a second, I think Bitcoin is a decent example. Bitcoin uses SHA256 and to cut it short, the more hashes you generate, the more bitcoins you get (which you can trade for real money) and as such people are motivated to use GPUs for this purpose. You can see in the hardware overview that an average graphic card that costs only $150 can calculate more than 200 million hashes/s. The longer and more complex your password is, the longer time it will take. Calculating at 200M/s, to try all possibilities for an 8 character alphanumberic (capital, lower, numbers) will take around 300 hours. The real time will most likely less if the password is something eligible or a common english word.

As such with anything security you need to look at in context. What is the attacker's motivation? What is the kind of application? Having a hash with random salt for each gives pretty good protection against cases where something like thousands of passwords are compromised.

One thing you can do is also add additional brute force protection by slowing down the hashing procedure. As you only hash passwords once, and the attacker has to do it many times, this works in your favor. The typical way to do is to take a value, hash it, take the output, hash it again and so forth for a fixed amount of iterations. You can try something like 1,000 or 10,000 iterations for example. This will make it that many times times slower for the attacker to find each password.

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But since the output is still that same number of bytes, what good would hash-rehash-rehash-rehash do? Afterall, a smart attacker would just got to hash some random stuff and try to find a hash collision right? –  Pacerier Jun 25 '12 at 15:40
    
It makes it more time consuming to guess the password by doing a dictionary attack. i.e. if the attacker got a hold of the password hash somehow, he could try to guess the password, hash it and see if they match. Given the right hardware, the attacker could potentially test hundred millions of passwords a second. Anything that would substantially slow down this speed would make it less likely that the attacker would find the password. –  Can Gencer Jul 1 '12 at 13:56
    
@Pacerier: When finding a second preimage by brute force is easier than brute-forcing the right password, you would have won already, since you would need to try around 2^(n-1) different preimages until you find one, and this is not feasible even with a fast hash function of decent output size (even the quite broken MD5), much less with a slow one. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 4 '13 at 20:06
    
The slowing down is kind of needed anyways, because the key is not the (non-)brokenness of the hash function, but the small input space of possible (memorable) passwords. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 4 '13 at 20:07
    
I wouldn't link valerieaurora.org/hash.html , it marks SHA-2 as weakened, which is quite an exaggeration. I'm not aware of any real attacks exceeding 46 rounds (SHA-256 has 64, SHA-512 has 64). The security margin is certainly smaller compared with SHA-3, but it's still far from broken. –  CodesInChaos 22 hours ago

And what if I have a way to mix the salt with the password in a way that makes the password the key to find the salt before an attacker can start doing something with the hashed password?

In the function hash_password the password will be hashed the conventional way and then the salt will be mixed into the salted password string based on the numeric values of the characters and the sum of any numeric characters. Ofcourse the salt is random generated.

The function compare_password will use the password to reverse this process resulting in the salt used to hash the password in the first place. With the found salt the password can be compared with the salted Password.

this idea should make it very difficult to find the salt to generate the rainbow table. basically: if you have the password, you can unlock and get in, if you don't have the password the hashed password string is completely useless since you do not know the salt (which is also random).

Ofcourse, if someone got access to your database AND your sourcecode this process would be useless, but might add an extra weight.

hope to learn what you think!

function hash_password($password, $salt = null) {
if (is_null($salt)) {
    $hash = "";
    $count = mt_rand(1, 100);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
        $hash .= substr(crypt(mt_rand(1, 9999999999)), 0, mt_rand(0, 13));
    }
    $salt = crypt($hash, '$2a$10$' . $hash . '$');
}
$saltedPassword = crypt($password, '$2a$10$' . $salt . '$');
$sumord = strlen($password);
$sumnr = 1;
while (true) {
    if (strlen($salt) <= 0)
        break;
    for ($i = 0; $i < strlen($password); $i++) {
        if (strlen($salt) <= 0)
            break;
        $ord = ord($password[$i]);
        $sumord += $ord;
        if (ctype_digit($password[$i]))
            $sumnr += $password[$i];
        $key = $sumnr * $sumord;
        $position = $key % 60;
        $group = ($sumord % 2) ? 3 : 2;
        if (strlen($salt) < $group)
            $group = strlen($salt);
        if ($key % 2) {
            $saltedPassword = substr($saltedPassword, 0, $position) . substr($salt, 0, $group) . substr($saltedPassword, $position);
            $salt = substr($salt, $group, strlen($salt));
        } else {
            $saltedPassword1 = substr($saltedPassword, 0, strlen($saltedPassword) - $position);
            $saltedPassword = $saltedPassword1 . substr($salt, strlen($salt) - $group, strlen($salt)) . substr($saltedPassword, strlen($saltedPassword1));
            $salt = substr($salt, 0, strlen($salt) - $group);
        }
    }
}
return $saltedPassword;
}

function compare_password($password, $saltedPassword) {
$sumord = strlen($password);
$sumnr = 1;
$decoders = array();
$salt = 60;
while (true) {
    if ($salt <= 0)
        break;
    for ($i = 0; $i < strlen($password); $i++) {
        if ($salt <= 0)
            break;
        $ord = ord($password[$i]);
        $sumord += $ord;
        if (ctype_digit($password[$i]))
            $sumnr += $password[$i];
        $key = $sumnr * $sumord;
        $position = $key % 60;
        $group = ($sumord % 2) ? 3 : 2;
        if ($salt < $group)
            $group = strlen($salt);
        $decoders[] = array("ord" => $ord, "sumord" => $sumord, "sumnr" => $sumnr, "group" => $group, "key" => $key);
        $salt = $salt - $group;
    }
}
$decoders = array_reverse($decoders);
$salt = "";
$unsaltedPassword = $saltedPassword;
foreach ($decoders as $decoder) {
    if (strlen($salt) >= 60)
        break;
    $position = $decoder['key'] % 60;
    if ($decoder['key'] % 2) {
        $salt = substr($unsaltedPassword, $position, $decoder['group']) . $salt;
        $unsaltedPassword = substr($unsaltedPassword, 0, $position) . substr($unsaltedPassword, $position + $decoder['group']);
    } else {
        $salt .= substr($unsaltedPassword, strlen($unsaltedPassword) - ($position + $decoder['group']), $decoder['group']);
        $unsaltedPassword = substr($unsaltedPassword, 0, strlen($unsaltedPassword) - ($position + $decoder['group'])) . substr($unsaltedPassword, (strlen($unsaltedPassword) - $position));
    }
}
return $saltedPassword == hash_password($password, $salt);
}
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I'm pretty sure that a unique salt for each hash/password is the safest method.

I've gone further . . the salt is a UDID which is stored, encrypted by another secret UDID.

Also the hash is performed a random amount of iteration between 50,000 and 100,000.

The hash and salt are also reversed x amount of iterations.

The amount of iterations are also stored encrypted by the secret UDID.

I think I'm right in saying that's a safe and quick method.

There would be other vulnerabilities to worry about at this stage.

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