Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Having an awful time trying to get the accurate time for a set of MP3s. I have these following properties that are generated using the MP3SPI 1.9.5 library.

//      mp3.crc=true
//      mp3.copyright=true
//      mp3.padding=false
//      mp3.channels=1
//      mp3.version.mpeg=2.5
//      mp3.length.bytes=6425480
//      mp3.framerate.fps=27.777779
//      mp3.framesize.bytes=140
//      duration=1606356000
//      mp3.version.layer=3
//      mp3.length.frames=44621
//      mp3.frequency.hz=8000
//      mp3.header.pos=0
//      mp3.bitrate.nominal.bps=16000
//      mp3.vbr.scale=0
//      mp3.version.encoding=MPEG2DOT5L3
//      mp3.mode=3
//      mp3.vbr=false
//      mp3.original=false

Now the file I am reading has a duration of 47:35 as reported by iTunes, and 48:50 using Mac Preview.

When I get the duration in Java using the library I get 26:46:

AudioFileFormat fileFormat = AudioSystem.getAudioFileFormat(f);
            Map<?, ?> properties = ((TAudioFileFormat) fileFormat).properties();
            String key = "duration";
            long duration = ((Long) properties.get("duration")) / 1000;
            {
                String frameBased = String.format("Duration Tag: %d hours, %d min, %d sec",
                        TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(duration),
                        TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(duration),
                        TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toSeconds(duration) - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(duration))
                    );
                    System.out.println(frameBased);
            }

I'm not having much luck, so I was wondering if I'm doing something dumb, or if I can use the information within the MP3 tags to calculate my actual length? Given iTunes is reporting it correctly I assume I should be able to.

share|improve this question
1  
Unfortunately, that is also the only fail-safe way. –  Kilian Foth Jul 21 '11 at 13:42
1  
I think you have to scan the MP3 file frame by frame to determine its true length. –  Nayuki Minase Jul 21 '11 at 14:11
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given iTunes is reporting it correctly I assume I should be able to.

One fail-safe way to determine the length of the track is to convert it into a standard AudioInputStream and then measure the AIS.

Or, as per the comment of @Kilian Foth:

Unfortunately, that is also the only fail-safe way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.