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I'm asking for assistance concerning a general approach.

I have written some java code to check my mailbox for unread mails on buttonclick.

Now I want this code to permanently run in the background and check my mailbox every 2 minutes.

Bad idea:

while(true)
{
checkMails();
Thread.sleep(120000);
}

The rest of the graphical interface obviously freezes, so there has to happen some magic with threads, I suppose.

How could this be realized?

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2  
Timer could work, but if checkMails() takes any significant time then your UI will hang again. –  David Heffernan Jul 21 '11 at 14:05
1  
Make your own thread :D That's the best solution. –  Ryan Amos Jul 21 '11 at 14:17
    
@laika, if you have your answer, accept the one that helped to you the most so others can learn where you did. –  RMT Jul 21 '11 at 15:12

6 Answers 6

Why don't you just spawn a seperate thread that will handle the checkMails() and perform that action you already have. Just be careful when you update your GUI.

    Thread thread = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {

            while (true) {
                checkMails();
                Thread.sleep(120000);
            }
        }
    });

edit: Maybe you should add a check somewhere in the case you want to stop the checking for new mail (for whatever reason). Also you got to call thread.start();

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@Matt true, ill give example –  RMT Jul 21 '11 at 14:05

Use a javax.swing.Timer. Something like this:

int delay = 120000;
ActionListener taskPerformer = new ActionListener() {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
        checkMails();
    }
};
new Timer(delay, taskPerformer).start();
share|improve this answer
    
best one, for javax.swing.Timer +1 –  mKorbel Jul 21 '11 at 15:23

Either use a javax.swing.Timer, or SwingWorker, although the latter is a bit overkill in this scenario.


If this task does not modify any Swing components, then why not just spawn a separate thread, as such

Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable(){
    @Override
    public void run(){
        while(!Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted()){
            //do stuff

            try{
                Thread.sleep(120000);
            }catch(InterruptedException e){
                Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            }
        }
    }
});
t.start();

It's important to note that you'll probably want to use a boolean to ensure that the thread is only created once, since there's the potential that a new thread will spawn with each button click, which is probably not what you want.

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Thanks for that. When doing my stuff I'm inside the Thread class, i.e. in run(). From there I can't reach checkMails. Does checkMails have to be static? –  laika Jul 21 '11 at 14:19
1  
@laika, You can place this logic within checkMails(), if you want. Otherwise, you'll either need an instance of the object that contains this method, or as you said, you can make it a static utility method. –  Moonbeam Jul 21 '11 at 14:22

You need to use threading to solve this. Threads are like multitasking.

Thread t = new Thread(){
    public void run(){
        //do job
    }
}
t.start(); //starts the thread

To end the thread, you'll need some kind of stopping condition

public boolean run = false;
Thread t = new Thread(){
    public void run(){
        while(run)
            //do job
    }
}
public void startThread(){
    t.start(); //starts the thread
}

See also:

Thread.stop() will kill the thread, but this is very bad. For example, suppose that you're writing into an array

for(int i = 0; i < myAr.length; i++)
    myAr[i] = getStuff(i);

And at i = 5, Thread.stop() is called. Now your program thinks that everything is good, when in fact, it's not!

To kill the thread, set run to false. run is a boolean I showed in the second example. The other option is to create a subclass of Thread (not just in line overriding methods) and create a method halt() (stop is final). halt() will set run to false. run will still be a global boolean.

Here's an example of that.

public class MyThread extends Thread {
    public boolean run = true;
    public void run(){
        run = true;
        while(run)
            doStuff();
    }
    public void halt(){
        run = false;
    }
}

You need to be careful that two threads aren't modifying the same object at once, it would be like turning an object into a random number generator :/

Now that you have been given the power of threads, use it wisely, for good not for evil! Go forth and be thread-safe.

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Don't try this at home kids! You need to ensure that changes to the run variable made in one thread are going to be visible to the running thread. The easiest way to do this is make run volatile. –  brain Jul 21 '11 at 14:18
    
You're saying that the issue is that if you have multiple threads running on the same run, you'll have issues? Sometimes that's desired. Other times, you use my 2nd solution, subclassing. –  Ryan Amos Jul 21 '11 at 14:22
    
No, I'm saying that if the GUI thread (in this instance) calls halt(), setting run to false then MyThread will not necessarily stop because it may not ever see the run variable being set to false. –  brain Jul 21 '11 at 14:31
    
Tip: If you add a '6' to a search, e.g. 'javadoc+thread+6', the top hit will be the Java 6 JavaDocs. I edited your post to point to the Java 6 docs (+made a few other tweaks). Had to +1 it though. a) For linking to both JavaDocs & an article. b) For providing code examples & caveats, but mostly.. c) For "Go forth and be thread-safe." :-) –  Andrew Thompson Jul 21 '11 at 14:32
    
It is important to note that, while this answer is spot on as far as it goes, background threads should never attempt to update the GUI directly. If the background thread needs update something, it needs to schedule the change through Swing's EDT. –  jpm Jul 21 '11 at 14:43

Obviously you need to use EDT if you need to update the UI after finishing the checkMails() method.

And you are looking for asynchronous (other one is synchronous) way.

Certainly you are looking for SwingUtilities.html#invokeLater(java.lang.Runnable)

According to my knowledge, this is the correct way to do background task for Swing.

Runnable checkMail = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        while(true) {
            checkMails();
            Thread.sleep(120000); //but this is very naive approach to use sleep, consider using timer ;)
        }
    }
};

SwingUtilities.invokeLater(checkMail);

invokeLater(Runnable doRun): Causes doRun.run() to be executed asynchronously on the AWT event dispatching thread.

and

invokeAndWait(Runnable doRun): Causes doRun.run() to be executed synchronously on the AWT event dispatching thread.

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1  
invokeLater schedules the Runnable to be executed on the EDT, so this will block the user interface. –  lhballoti Jul 21 '11 at 14:33
    
No, its not. Edited the answer to add quote from documentation ;) –  Kowser Jul 21 '11 at 14:39
1  
-1, This answer is just wrong. –  Moonbeam Jul 21 '11 at 14:41
    
@Moonbeam good catch +1 –  mKorbel Jul 21 '11 at 15:22
    
@Moonbeam: got the point –  Kowser Sep 1 '11 at 17:01

A few ideas:

1) Create a java.util.Timer that fires periodically, checking the mailbox for messages and updating the GUI using SwingUtilities#invokeLater;

2) Create a timer (either java.util.Timer or javax.swing.Timer) that schedules a javax.swing.SwingWorker to both check the mailbox and update the GUI.

3) Create a Thread that checks the mailbox, updates the GUI using SwingUtilities#invokeLater and sleeps for some time;

I'd use 1 or 2, because you can just stop the timers if you ever need to cancel the task.

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