Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand things in here are value types and not referenced so the field _num won't be modified when I just update the list. But my question is how to update the field _num when I modify the list that contains it gets modified?

class Foo
{
    public List<object> mylist;

    private int _num;

    public int num
    {
        get
        {
            return _num;
        }
        set
        {
            this._num = value;
            mylist[0] = value;
        }

    }

    public Foo()
    {
        mylist = new List<object>();
        mylist.Add(_num);
    }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Foo my = new Foo();
        my.num = 12;
        my.mylist[0] = 5;
        Console.WriteLine("" + my.mylist[0] + " " + my.num);    ==> output is "5 12"
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

What changes could be done so the list and the field is synced? Like my output should be "5 5" Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
1  
Since we just helped answer a question containing this particular code, this is starting to smell suspiciously like homework. Is it? =) –  J. Steen Jul 21 '11 at 14:32
2  
Why do you need to store the same value in two places? –  FishBasketGordo Jul 21 '11 at 14:32
    
No. It is part of my work. I am implementing something that requires this functionality. –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 14:34
    
So I can access it with index. –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 14:34
2  
Maybe if you explain the intent of your design, we can help you in a better way. –  J. Steen Jul 21 '11 at 14:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This may or may not be what you want... and I'm still not sure I see the need for modifying the fields by index, but if you really want to do that have you considered an indexer for your type? That is, the indexer would replace your list like so:

class Foo
{
    public int num;
    public string name;
    public bool isIt;

    public object this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            switch(index)
            {
                case 0:
                    return num;
                case 1:
                    return name;
                case 2:
                    return isIt;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }
        }
        set
        {
            switch(index)
            {
                case 0:
                    num = (int) value;
                    break;
                case 1:
                    name = (string) value;
                    break;
                case 2:
                    isIt = (bool) value;
                    break;
                default:
                    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
            }
        }
    }
}

Then you can either say:

var foo = new Foo();
foo.num = 13;  // either works
foo[0] = 13;  // either works
share|improve this answer
2  
That's hideous. But does what it says on the tin... –  J. Steen Jul 21 '11 at 14:45
2  
Yeah, it's not the most elegant, but if the user really wants a way to reference a property directly or by index, it does the job. –  James Michael Hare Jul 21 '11 at 14:47
1  
Quite so. Eliminates the need of managing two sets of values, too. It's elegant for the constraints given. –  J. Steen Jul 21 '11 at 14:48
    
it is just the implementation of this what you did longer, but accessing it many ways is a breeze. Finally a very simple, nice and clean solution. Thank you. Much appreciated! :))) –  Vikyboss Jul 21 '11 at 14:49
4  
It works, but it's altogether too clever by half. If I saw this in production code I'd have a conniption. –  Justin Morgan Jul 21 '11 at 14:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.