Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My code:

for (var i = 0; i < mapInfos.length; i++) {

            var x = function () { doStuff(i); };
            google.maps.event.addListenerOnce(mapInfos[i].map, 'tilesloaded', x);
}

The doStuff method simply alerts the value of i. mapInfos has two entries, so you'd expect it to alert 0 and 1, but instead it alerts 2 and 2. I can appreciate vaguely why it is doing this (although var i should keep it local to the scope of the loop?) but how can I make it work as intended?

share|improve this question
1  
Doh - I can't even guess how often this question was asked before. –  jAndy Jul 21 '11 at 14:44
    
Your original jsfiddle was a good example. –  Pointy Jul 21 '11 at 14:47
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

edit — note that when first posted, the original question included a link to a jsfiddle that seemed to be a relevant example of what the current question is trying to achieve, only it appears to work ...


The code in the jsfiddle works because there's only one "i" in that code. The "i" used in the second loop (where the functions are actually called) is the same "i" as used in the first loop. Thus, you get the right answer because that second loop is running "i" through all the values from zero through four again. If you added:

i = 100;
functions[0]();

you'd get 100 printed out.

The only way to introduce a new scope in JavaScript is a function. One approach is to write a separate "function maker" function:

function makeCallback(param) {
  return function() {
    doStuff(param);
  };
}

Then in your loop:

for (var i = 0; i < mapInfos.length; i++) {
  var x = makeCallback(i);
  google.maps.event.addListenerOnce(mapInfos[i].map, 'titlesloaded', x);
}

That'll work because the call to the "makeCallback" function isolates a copy of the value of "i" into a new, unique instance of "param" in the closure returned.

share|improve this answer
    
What jsfiddle? What second loop? –  Quentin Jul 21 '11 at 14:48
    
@Quentin there was a jsfiddle link when the question was first posted. It's linked in a comment I added to the question. It's an interesting piece of code :-) –  Pointy Jul 21 '11 at 14:51
    
Sorry, I quickly noticed the same thing as the person who answered put, and removed the JSFiddle because it didn't corroborate the rest of my question:) –  SLC Jul 21 '11 at 15:55
    
The function factory worked a treat - the initial solution I found on google was to use new function() { } but this does -not- work properly and the function factory is much better! –  SLC Jul 21 '11 at 15:58
add comment

Create a new scope for it.

Functions create scope.

function doStuffFactory(i) {
    return function () { doStuff(i); };
}

for (var i = 0; i < mapInfos.length; i++) {
    var x = doStuffFactory(i);
    google.maps.event.addListenerOnce(mapInfos[i].map, 'tilesloaded', x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
eehhr...google.maps.event.addListenerOnce(mapInfos[i].map, 'tilesloaded', doStuff(i)); ? –  jAndy Jul 21 '11 at 14:45
1  
@jAndy: You're now passing the result of calling the function, not a reference to it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 21 '11 at 14:46
    
@Tomalak: fair enough, note myself. –  jAndy Jul 21 '11 at 14:47
    
@jAndy — No. The original code has the 3rd argument as a function. I'm assuming that doStuff doesn't return one. You could put the call to doStuffFactory there directly instead of going via x if you like though. –  Quentin Jul 21 '11 at 14:47
1  
@HoLyVieR — your answer also also creates a function each time it loops. –  Quentin Jul 21 '11 at 14:59
show 1 more comment

Change it to

var x = function (param) { doStuff(param); };

Obviously what is going on is that you are alerting a variable that is changing. With the above change it copies it so even if i changes it will still alert the right value.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Javascript doesn't have block scope, so you don't get an x that's local to the loop. Yea!

It has function scope, though.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yep, weird isn't it!Pointy has an explanation

I have no idea why your first example worked (I wasn't expecting it to) Pointy has an explanation of why your first example worked - The reason why your second one doesn't is because i is scoped to the function containing the for loop, not to the scope defined by the for loop. In fact the only things that have scope in JavaScript are functions. This means that by the time your function gets executed i is 2.

What you need to do is create a scope, for example:

for (var i = 0; i < mapInfos.length; i++) {

    var x = (function() {
        return function () { doStuff(i); };
    })(i);
    google.maps.event.addListenerOnce(mapInfos[i].map, 'tilesloaded', x);
}

See JavaScript closures in for-loops for more.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.