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I recently wrote a Powershell script that works great - However, I'd like to now upgrade the script and add some error checking / handling - But I've been stumped at the first hurdle it seems. Why won't the following code work?

try {
  Remove-Item "C:\somenonexistentfolder\file.txt" -ErrorAction Stop
}

catch [System.Management.Automation.ItemNotFoundException] {
  "item not found"
}

catch {
  "any other undefined errors"
  $error[0]
}

finally {
  "Finished"
}

The error is caught in the second catch block - You can see the output from $error[0]. Obviously I would like to catch it in the first block - What am I missing? Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 23 down vote accepted

-ErrorAction Stop is changing things for you. Try adding this and see what you get.


Catch [System.Management.Automation.ActionPreferenceStopException] {
"caught a StopExecution Exception" 
$error[0]
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty interesting, considering $_.Exception is an ItemNotFoundException and not an ActionPreferencesStopException. I bet the latter drives from RuntimeException. –  Joel B Fant Jul 21 '11 at 17:34
    
I think you're right. I like your switch version. More in line with what steve is trying to do. –  Bruce Jul 21 '11 at 17:49
5  
Right, the trouble here is that it is a non-terminating error. So even though it is a ItemNotFoundException, it isn't actually getting thrown unless wrapped in a ActionPreferencesStopException. As a developer, this annoys me. :) –  JasonMArcher Jul 21 '11 at 23:32

That is very odd.

I went through ItemNotFoundException's base classes and tested the following multiple catches to see what would catch it:

try {
  remove-item C:\nonexistent\file.txt -erroraction stop
}
catch [System.Management.Automation.ItemNotFoundException] {
  write-host 'ItemNotFound'
}
catch [System.Management.Automation.SessionStateException] {
  write-host 'SessionState'
}
catch [System.Management.Automation.RuntimeException] {
  write-host 'RuntimeException'
}
catch [System.SystemException] {
  write-host 'SystemException'
}
catch [System.Exception] {
  write-host 'Exception'
}
catch {
  write-host 'well, darn'
}

As it turns out, the output was 'RuntimeException'. I also tried it with a different exception CommandNotFoundException:

try {
  do-nonexistent-command
}
catch [System.Management.Automation.CommandNotFoundException] {
  write-host 'CommandNotFoundException'
}
catch {
  write-host 'well, darn'
}

That output 'CommandNotFoundException' correctly.

I vaguely remember reading elsewhere (though I couldn't find it again) of problems with this. In such cases where exception filtering didn't work correctly, they would catch the closest Type they could and then use a switch. The following just catches Exception instead of RuntimeException, but is the switch equivalent of my first example that checks all base types of ItemNotFoundException:

try {
  Remove-Item C:\nonexistent\file.txt -ErrorAction Stop
}
catch [System.Exception] {
  switch($_.Exception.GetType().FullName) {
    'System.Management.Automation.ItemNotFoundException' {
      write-host 'ItemNotFound'
    }
    'System.Management.Automation.SessionStateException' {
      write-host 'SessionState'
    }
    'System.Management.Automation.RuntimeException' {
      write-host 'RuntimeException'
    }
    'System.SystemException' {
      write-host 'SystemException'
    }
    'System.Exception' {
      write-host 'Exception'
    }
    default {'well, darn'}
  }
}

This writes 'ItemNotFound', as it should.

share|improve this answer
    
See the comment thread in Bruce's answer. –  JasonMArcher Jul 21 '11 at 23:32

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