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Is excessive use of this in C++ a code smell
Using “this” in front of member variables in C++
When should you use the "this" keyword in C++?
Is there any reason to use this->

In C++, is the keyword "this" usually omitted? For example:

Person::Person(int age) {
    _age = age;
}

As opposed to:

Person::Person(int age) {
    this->_age = age;
}
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marked as duplicate by Kev Jul 21 '11 at 16:46

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5  
most people use it when the variable passed to the function has the same name as the instance variable... –  hmbl9r Jul 21 '11 at 16:44
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6 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes, it is not required and usually ommited. It might be required for accessing variables after they have been overridden in the scope though:

Person::Person() {
    int age;
    this->age = 1;
}

Also, this:

Person::Person(int age) {
    _age = age;
}

Is pretty bad style, if you need an initializer with the same name use this:

Person::Person(int age) : age(age) { }
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It's programmer preference. Personally, I love using this since it explicitly marks the object members. Of course the _ does the same thing (only when you follow the convention)

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5  
The underscore only does the same thing if you follow the convention. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 21 '11 at 16:44
5  
Using this to explicitly mark object members also only works when you follow the convention. –  Robert Martin Nov 13 '13 at 13:12
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this points to the object in whose member function it is reffered, so it is optional.

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For the example case above, it is usually omitted, yes. However, either way is syntactically correct.

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Yes. unless, there is an ambiguity.

It is also used sometimes to avoid some compilers optimizing virtual function call.

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5  
o avoid some compilers optimizing virtual function call, How so? –  Alok Save Jul 21 '11 at 16:47
    
Yes, explain please? –  Gerard Apr 29 at 16:36
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Either way works, but many places have coding standards in place that will guide the developer one way or the other. If such a policy is not in place, just follow your heart. One thing, though, it REALLY helps the readability of the code if you do use it. especially if you are not following a naming convention on class-level variable names.

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