Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use emails for usernames, and have got it working almost perfectly. I followed these directions: http://www.micahcarrick.com/django-email-authentication.html

The problem is, my login form still is throwing an error that says the username can only be 30 characters. I've changed the input form to accept 75 chars and the database table to as well. But something in Django is still blocking this.

Any ideas?

UPDATE:

<form method="post" action="." class="full">
{% csrf_token %}
<ul>
    {% if form.non_field_errors %}<li>{{ form.non_field_errors }}</li>{% endif %}
    <li>
        {{ form.username.errors }}
        <label for="id_username">Email/Username</label>
        <input type="text" id="id_username" name="username" maxlength="75">
    </li>
    <li>
        {{ form.password.errors }}
        <label for="id_password">{{ form.password.label }}</label>
        {{ form.password }}
    </li>
</ul>
<input type="submit" value="Login">
<a href="{% url django.contrib.auth.views.password_reset %}">Forgot your password?</a>
</form>
share|improve this question
    
@Brenden: What exactly is in the revised Form you're using? Please update the question to include the Form class. Is there a clean method which will truncate long inputs? –  S.Lott Jul 21 '11 at 18:18
1  
Just to check, did you change the field length of username in django.contrib.auth.models.User from 30 to 75, then drop the old auth table from the db, grab fresh SQL to create the auth table by running manage.py sqlall, and execute this SQL to create the new table with the updated field length? –  S.Lott Jul 21 '11 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the end, I fixed this by adding this to my top level init

# Added so the login field can take email addresses longer than 30 characters
from django.contrib.auth.forms import AuthenticationForm

AuthenticationForm.base_fields['username'].max_length = 150
AuthenticationForm.base_fields['username'].widget.attrs['maxlength'] = 150
AuthenticationForm.base_fields['username'].validators[0].limit_value = 150
share|improve this answer

Just to check, did you change the field length of username in django.contrib.auth.models.User from 30 to 75, then drop the old auth table from the db, grab fresh SQL to create the auth table by running manage.py sqlall, and execute this SQL to create the new table with the updated field length?

(Since this is just a follow up question, I'd leave it in a comment but don't have quite enough rep yet...)

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the missing step is changing the user from 30 to 75 in the django.contrib.auth.models .. Where would I put code that will do that without needing to touch the actual django code? –  Brenden Jul 25 '11 at 4:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.