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So now that the TabActivity is officially deprecated as of 3.0, I'm going through and switching all of my TabActivities to Fragments. But first I decided to research a little about Fragments

I'm reading the design philosophy and one of the lines is:

Android introduced fragments in Android 3.0 (API Level "Honeycomb"), primarily to support more dynamic and flexible UI designs on large screens, such as tablets.

Now, I'm not developing for a tablet, nor will my app ever see a tablet. Barring the bad idea of using deprecated code, what do I have to gain if I'm not going to use a big screens or animations, which seems to be the main thing they are touting?

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Now, I'm not developing for a tablet, nor will my app ever see a tablet.

That may only be the case if you're not shipping the app. Just because you are writing it for a phone does not prevent tablet owners from installing it. It may be that you are using hardware capabilities that tend to be used by phones and not tablets (e.g., telephony), but there's nothing stopping a hardware manufacturer from offering those capabilities in a tablet.

Barring the bad idea of using deprecated code, what do I have to gain if I'm not going to use a big screens or animations, which seems to be the main thing they are touting?

Fragments offer some benefits, such as simpler management of configuration changes, that are more annoying than they need to be without fragments.

More importantly, an increasing percentage of the Android UI will require fragments going forward. For example, as you note, tabs (particularly activities-in-tabs) are going away, being replaced by tabs in the action bar controlling fragments. Now, you may think that this is only for tablets, but it is likely that when Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) ships later this year, the action bar and tabs will be extended to phones as well. While old-style tabs should still function on ICS phones, they will look odd by comparison. Whether or not "odd" is a problem is up to you, of course.

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The application is only going out to specific phones and it will only be running on 2.3.3. It is a guarantee. I know android released a backwards compatibility patch for older OS's, but I'm not sure I will be allowed to install it given the restrictions on the phone so that may wind up being the deciding factor anyway. – Otra Jul 26 '11 at 10:44
    
Hey, I'm sorry to dig up an old post, but I'd really appreciate any input. Do you think it's worth using Fragments in a project targeting pre-4.0 Android Phones? They seem neat and all, but I feel slightly uncomfortable using the Android Support Package. Granted it IS from Google, so it must do okay, but I still have the feeling that it's just a work-around. – cesar Jan 18 '12 at 19:32
    
@anonymous: "Do you think it's worth using Fragments in a project targeting pre-4.0 Android Phones?" -- yes, because you should be targeting post-3.0 devices before the year is out. "Granted it IS from Google, so it must do okay, but I still have the feeling that it's just a work-around" -- it is just a backport. It is 90+% the same code as what you have in 3.0+ devices. – CommonsWare Jan 18 '12 at 19:39
    
First off, thanks for the really, really quick response haha. I didn't expect anything till tomorrow. Second, I'd love to target post-3.0 devices, but clients prefer backwards compatibility, especially since the majority of android users are still on 2.1/2.2 (at least according to google). – cesar Jan 18 '12 at 19:48
    
@anonymous: First, your stats are out of date, according to Google. Second, maintaining backwards compatibility is indeed important. That is why Google and independent developers try to backport as many things as is practical, so you can have backwards compatibility and be taking advantage of current techniques. I am in the process of rewriting a few hundred pages of material to emphasize that you should be using fragments (via Android Support) and the action bar (via ActionBarSherlock) for new app construction for all devices. – CommonsWare Jan 18 '12 at 19:58

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