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I have two classes like this:

public abstract class MyBase
{
     protected MyBase(){
         Initialize();
     }

     protected IDictionary<string,string> _data;

     private void Initialize() {
         // Use Reflection to get all properties
         // of the derived class (e.g., call new MyDerived() then
         // I want to know the names "Hello" and "ID" here
         var data = GetDataFromBackend(propertyNamesFromDerived);
         _data = data;
     }
}

public class MyConcrete : MyBase
{
     public MyConcrete(){
         // Possibly use Reflection here
         Hello = _data["Hello"];
         ID = new Guid(data["ID"]);
     }

     public string Hello {get;set;}
     public Guid ID {get; set;}
}

As you see, I want the constructor of my base class to know about the properties of the derived class I'm instantiating.

Now, this seems like a huge and big code smell, so let me give some more background about my intentions, maybe there is a better way.

I have a backend system that stores Key/Value Pairs, essentially a Dictionary<string,string>. I want to abstract away working with this backend system in a way where people can create classes whose properties are Keys into the backend system. When they construct this object, it will automatically load the data from that system and initialize all the variables to it.

In other words, I've just reinvented serialization, except that I don't control the backend system and just rather make working with it really painless. I don't want callers to have to call Initialize() after constructing the object, because in 100% of the cases you have to initalize it after constructing.

I don't want to move the initialize code into the Derived Classes, except for string-to-business-object conversion.

Would I have to use a Factory? Or is it considered safe to look at the property names of a derived class in a base constructor? (Don't care about their values and that they aren't initialized, just need the names).

Or is there a better way altogether to provide a facade between a Dictionary of strings and a concrete business object?

Edit: This is .net 3.5, so no System.Dynamic which would make this trivial :(

Edit 2: After looking at the Answers and thinking through this some more, I guess my question really boils down to this now: Is calling GetType().GetProperties() from a base constructor in order to get the Names of Properties and if they are decorated with a certain Attribute safe?

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6 Answers

Wait, let's stop here for a second and do this properly. It shouldn't be MyBase's responsibility to do this.

So you write a class that manages getting stuff out of the backend for you, and you write a method on that class that is something like

T Get<T>() where T : new()

and you make Get responsible for reading the dictionary out of the backend and using reflection to populate an instance of T. Thus, you say

var concrete = foo.Get<MyConcrete>();

This isn't hard, and it's the right way to do it.

Incidentally, the code for Get is going to look something like

T t = new T();
var properties = typeof(T).GetProperties();
foreach(var property in properties) {
    property.SetValue(t, dictionary[property.Name], null);
}
return t;

where dictionary is your loaded up key/value pairs. It turns out there are more optimal ways to do this, but unless it's a bottleneck I wouldn't worry about it.

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Thanks. After looking through this, I've clarified my question as the part I'm really interested in was whether GetType().GetProperties() is safe, just to get names and attributes - don't care about values or setting them in the base class anymore. –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 20:10
    
@Michael Stum: Define "safe." –  Jason Jul 21 '11 at 20:22
    
Within the guarantees of the language and runtime. Trying to find out at the moment what guarantees the CLR makes about the state of an object when the ctor runs. –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 20:24
    
@Michael Stum: What are you hoping it guarantees? –  Jason Jul 21 '11 at 20:39
    
@Michael Stum: I can't stress enough how much you should not being doing this in the constructor of the base class, or anywhere else anywhere on the inheritance chain off of the base class. You were right when you said it's a code smell. When your fridge smells bad, you clean it, you don't blindly reach in and grab a moldy sandwich. –  Jason Jul 21 '11 at 20:41
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The better way to do this would be to make the classes use the dictionary directly:

public string Hello {
    get { return (string)base.data["Hello"]; }
    set { base.data["Hello"] = value; }
}

You may want to call TryGetValue in the getter so that you can return a default value if the key isn't there. (You should probably do that in a separate method in the base class)

You can make a code snippet to make the properties easier to create.

If you don't want to do it this way, you can call GetType().GetProperties() to get PropertyInfo objects for the properties in your class, then call SetValue(this, value).
This will be slow; there are various tricks you can use to speed it up using expression trees, CreateDelegate, or IL generation.

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Thanks. After looking through this, I've clarified my question as the part I'm really interested in was whether GetType().GetProperties() is safe, just to get names and attributes - don't care about values or setting them in the base class anymore. –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 20:10
1  
@Michael: Yes, it is safe. Unlike C++, the object is fully constructed; all that hasn't happened is the user code in the derived ctor. You can call GetType() or even cast it to its derived type. –  SLaks Jul 21 '11 at 20:16
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Maybe try the Template method pattern

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Wouldn't that mean that I have to make Initialize abstract and move the plumbing into the Concrete class? I'd like to avoid that –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 19:22
    
No you would for example add an abstract method listProperties that gets called inside of Initialize to query exactly the required data. –  marc Jul 21 '11 at 19:25
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Have you considered using an ExpandoObject? With it you can dynamically add properties and inspect them (when serializing for example).

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Very good point. Forgot to say: I'm on .net 3.5, so no Dynamic awesomeness :( –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 19:23
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I'm not sure if it's what you really should do, but here's what you asked for (put this in Initialize, and you'll get a list of the derived property names):

        var derivedProps = this.GetType().GetProperties();
        var propNames = new List<string>(derivedProps.Select(x => x.Name));

From there, using the PropertyInfos in derivedProps, you can set the properties.

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You can't really safely do anything to those properties in the base-class constructor anyway as some derived constructor may reset them anyway. You're much better off doing a two-phased load (e.g. call Initialize explicitly)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. After looking through this, I've clarified my question as the part I'm really interested in was whether GetType().GetProperties() is safe, just to get names and attributes - don't care about values or setting them in the base class anymore. –  Michael Stum Jul 21 '11 at 20:10
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