Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Is there a way to open a Google Chrome plugin's options.html page via Javascript in background.html?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted
chrome.tabs.create({ url: "options.html" });

Update

Starting with version 40, Chrome now uses a new popup options dialog from the extension management page instead of dedicated options pages (which are being deprecated). You can still achieve the same effect with a modification to the URL.

chrome.tabs.create({ 'url': 'chrome://extensions/?options=' + chrome.runtime.id });
share|improve this answer
    
oh rats... that looks much cleaner XD –  Joseph Marikle Jul 21 '11 at 20:38
1  
Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'create' of undefined –  Ska Aug 13 '13 at 16:01
    
@Ska You cannot use this directly in a content script. It must be in a background script or you must use the web_accessible_resources option in your manifest file. –  Nilpo Feb 20 at 0:58
1  
In the updated part of this answer you forgot the "url:" part. The call should be chrome.tabs.create({ "url": "chrome://extensions/?options=" + chrome.runtime.id }); –  Cray Mar 31 at 14:44

Open or switch to already opened options page (instead of opening a duplicate):

var optionsUrl = chrome.extension.getURL('options.html');

chrome.tabs.query({url: optionsUrl}, function(tabs) {
    if (tabs.length) {
        chrome.tabs.update(tabs[0].id, {active: true});
    } else {
        chrome.tabs.create({url: optionsUrl});
    }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
chrome.extension.getURL is unneccessary. update and create both accept URLs relative to the calling page or script. –  Nilpo Feb 20 at 1:08
1  
Actually chrome.extension.getURL is necessary. chrome.tabs.query does not accept fragment identifiers for URLs. It should also be noted that the Tabs permission is required since you're trying to access tab URLs. –  MDMower Mar 27 at 17:48

There is a new method that will be enabled is enabled beginning with Chrome 42:

chrome.runtime.openOptionsPage(function callback)

Open your Extension's options page, if possible.

The precise behavior may depend on your manifest's options_ui or options_page key, or what Chrome happens to support at the time. For example, the page may be opened in a new tab, within chrome://extensions, within an App, or it may just focus an open options page. It will never cause the caller page to reload.

If your Extension does not declare an options page, or Chrome failed to create one for some other reason, the callback will set lastError.

share|improve this answer

yup...

e.g.

window.open("chrome-extension://ghipmampnddcpdlppkkamoankmkmcbmh/options.html")

or

location.href = "chrome-extension://ghipmampnddcpdlppkkamoankmkmcbmh/options.html"
share|improve this answer
2  
This way you have to know extension's key. It's ambiguous. Accepted answer is better. –  szamil Oct 28 '13 at 16:06
1  
@szamil I'm going to keep this answer based on the fact that it enables someone who is not the developer to open up the options page via javascript and externally to the extension. I am not sure if that is what the original poster was intending (in fact it's quite unlikely), but this answer may be useful to someone at some time. Not that I'm proud of this answer... I think this answer is horrible structured, but that's what the vote system is for. –  Joseph Marikle Oct 28 '13 at 16:14
    
@JosephMarikle Your correct. This answer is poor in practice, but it's good for understanding the inner workings. –  Nilpo Feb 20 at 1:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.