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I'm building a blog engine that has multiple post types, e.g.: text, image, link, quote.

The way I see it, I have two options:

Option 1: A single Posts table with all columns, some of which will inevitably be NULL

Post table
==========
* post_id
* created_at
* updated_at
* user_id
* post_type
* text
* image_url
* link_url
* quote_source

Option 2: Separate tables for each post type

Post table
==========
* post_id
* created_at
* updated_at
* user_id
* post_type

Text table
==========
* post_id
* text

Image table
===========
* post_id
* image_url

I think you get the hint. What are the pros/cons of each approach?

Does anyone know what Tumblr does? (It's not clear from their API docs.)

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closed as primarily opinion-based by C-Pound Guru, Unsigned, Henk Holterman, dirkk, Filburt Jul 24 '14 at 23:05

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer 1

Avoid using multiple tables for like entities (in this case "Posts"). I have no idea how Tumblr itself does it, but it's most likely more similar to your first post, with some fields NULL in each row, and their executable code evaluates the post_type value to determine how to handle it.

Multiple tables would quickly become a nightmare as you're pulling data from several tables to handle "one" request. For example, if you wanted to SELECT all the posts, of all types, in the last week, you'd have to SELECT from each table and merge the results (either in some sort of SQL temp table, or programmatically in your script/executable code). And that's just for a simple thing. Imagine searching, etc.

Again, I don't know how Tumblr does it, nor is their a "right" way - but the efficient way is one table.

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