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How can two threads access a synchronized block simultaneously? That is, how can I make one thread give the chance for the other thread to execute a synchronized block, even before this thread finishes the execution of the same synchronized block?

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If you describe the problem more specifically we might be able to come up with better solutions. What algorithm are you trying to implement? What problem is your code solving? –  Spike Gronim Jul 21 '11 at 21:15
    
You should rephrase your questions, since its obvious two threads cannot access the same synchronized block simultaneously - which is the whole point of synchronized in the first place. –  Perception Jul 21 '11 at 21:18
    
@Perception:Except that they clearly can, depending on your definition of "access." –  Mark Peters Jul 21 '11 at 21:24
    
@Mark Peters - I was using the dictionary definition of the word. –  Perception Jul 21 '11 at 21:31
    
The point of a synchronized block is to only allow one running thread at a time. Perhaps if you give an example it'll help us understand what "access a synchronized block simultaneously" means. –  trutheality Jul 21 '11 at 21:32

5 Answers 5

See wait(), notify(), and notifyAll().

Edit: The edit to your question is incorrect. The sleep() method does not release the monitor.

For example:

private static final Object lock = new Object();

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);
    executorService.execute(new One());
    executorService.execute(new Two());
}

static class One implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        synchronized (lock) {
            System.out.println("(One) I own the lock");
            System.out.println("(One) Giving up the lock and waiting");
            try {
                lock.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                System.err.println("(One) I shouldn't have been interrupted");
            }
            System.out.println("(One) I have the lock back now");
        }
    }
}

static class Two implements Runnable {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(100);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.err.println("(Two) I shouldn't have been interrupted");
        }
        synchronized (lock) {
            System.out.println("(Two) Now I own the lock (Two)");
            System.out.println("(Two) Giving up the lock using notify()");
            lock.notify();
        }
    }
}
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What does this have to do with the question? –  toto2 Jul 21 '11 at 23:18
    
@toto: Umm, what does it not have to do with it? It shows one thread entering a synchronized block, then relinquishing control of the monitor to another thread, which executes the block while the first thread is still in it, and then the first thread is woken up to complete executing the block. It's exactly what the question asked for: one thread to let another execute a synchronized block before it finishes itself. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 22 '11 at 1:49
    
I guess we are reading "before this thread finishes the execution of the same synchronized block?" differently. By "same" I read the exact same block, but I guess you read "the first block". –  toto2 Jul 22 '11 at 12:39
    
Oh, I see what you're saying. Yes, I agree that my example would fit the question better of both threads hit the exact same synchronized block, but when I was writing it, this was a more understandable way to express it. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 23 '11 at 0:18

It sounds like you might want to consider using more than one synchronized block, particularly if there's a blocking operation that one thread is getting caught on and thus blocking another thread that wants to execute something else in the block.

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A synchronized block is a block of code which can (by definition) only be accessed by one thread at a time. Saying that you want another thread to enter this block while another thread also currently processes it, does make the synchronized block scheme useless.

You probably want to split the synchronized block into many other ones.

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synchronized is there to make sure two threads can't be running the block at the same time, but it does not make the block atomic. Two threads can potentially simultaneously be "in" the block as long as only one is running. –  Mark Peters Jul 21 '11 at 21:22

The only way I can see if one thread calls wait() on monitor object. Then it will release monitor and wait for notification while other thread can execute synchronized block. Then other thread will have to call notify()/notifyAll() so first thread gets monitor back and continue.

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A thread can release its monitor using lock.wait(). Another thread can then pick up the monitor and enter the synchronized block.

Example:

public class MultipleThreadsInSynchronizedBlock {
    public static void main(String... args) {
        final Object lock = new Object();
        Runnable runnable = new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                synchronized (lock) {
                    System.out.println("Before wait");
                    try {
                        lock.wait();
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    }
                    System.out.println("After wait");
                }
            }
        };
        new Thread(runnable).start();
        new Thread(runnable).start();

        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }

        synchronized (lock) {
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}

This prints:

Before wait
Before wait
After wait
After wait

However it's not a "hack" to allow a mutually exclusive block to be run non-atomically. If you're going to use very low-level synchronization primitives like this you need to know what you're doing.

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