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I have what I thought would be a simple question but I suppose I'm missing something.

I have a website with two domain names associated with it. What I'd like to do is modify my .htaccess file so that anyone trying to access a particular folder is redirected to the correct domain name.

For example:

Someone accessing www.domain.com/folder/ should be redirected to www.website.com/folder/, but only for that folder.

What would I have to include in the .htaccess file to do this?

Any help will be appreciated!

share|improve this question

RewriteCond will do the trick. NOTE: I didn't test this verbatim, so it's psuedocodish.

RewriteCond ${HTTP_HOST} domain.com [OR]
RewriteCond ${HTTP_HOST} www.domain.com
RewriteRule ^folder/(.*)$ http://www.website.com/folder/$1 [QSA,R=301,L]

Make sure you check the docs at http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/mod_rewrite.html specifically flags like [QSA] which means to append the query string.

Note the R=301 flag, which will tell the visitor that this is a permanent redirect. There are many other flags you can use...

share|improve this answer
    
I would say RewriteCond ${HTTP_HOST} !=www.website.com will be better .. but that depends on circumstances. – LazyOne Jul 21 '11 at 22:07
    
This didn't quite work for me for the project I'm working on but solved another .htaccess issue I was having so much obliged! – Tom Hartman Jul 22 '11 at 15:06
    
For those curious, I found a workaround using PHP to generate a particular link I needed. The workaround was necessary due to time restrictions and is specific to the proprietary platform I'm working with. – Tom Hartman Jul 22 '11 at 15:07

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