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I have a program which interfaces with a radio I am using via a gui I wrote in PyQt. Obviously one of the main functions of the radio is to transmit data, but to do this continuously, I have to loop the writes, which causes the gui to hang. Since I have never dealt with threading, I tried to get rid of these hangs using QCoreApplication.processEvents(). The radio needs to sleep between transmissions, though, so the gui still hangs based on how long these sleeps last.

Is there a simple way to fix this using QThread? I have looked for tutorials on how to implement multithreading with PyQt, but most of them deal with setting up servers and are much more advanced than I need them to be. I honestly don't even really need my thread to update anything while it is running, I just need to start it, have it transmit in the background, and stop it.

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3 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I created a little example that shows 3 different and simple ways of dealing with threads. I hope it will help you find the right approach to your problem.

from PyQt4 import QtCore
import time
import sys


# Subclassing QThread
# http://doc.qt.nokia.com/latest/qthread.html
class AThread(QtCore.QThread):

    def run(self):
        count = 0
        while count < 5:
            time.sleep(1)
            print "Increasing"
            count += 1

# Subclassing QObject and using moveToThread
# http://labs.qt.nokia.com/2007/07/05/qthreads-no-longer-abstract/
class SomeObject(QtCore.QObject):

    finished = QtCore.pyqtSignal()

    def longRunning(self):
        count = 0
        while count < 5:
            time.sleep(1)
            print "Increasing"
            count += 1
        self.finished.emit()

# Using a QRunnable
# http://doc.qt.nokia.com/latest/qthreadpool.html
# Note that a QRunnable isn't a subclass of QObject and therefore does
# not provide signals and slots.
class Runnable(QtCore.QRunnable):

    def run(self):
        count = 0
        app = QtCore.QCoreApplication.instance()
        while count < 5:
            print "Increasing"
            time.sleep(1)
            count += 1
        app.quit()


def usingQThread():
    app = QtCore.QCoreApplication([])
    thread = AThread()
    thread.finished.connect(app.exit)
    thread.start()
    sys.exit(app.exec_())

def usingMoveToThread():
    app = QtCore.QCoreApplication([])
    objThread = QtCore.QThread()
    obj = SomeObject()
    obj.moveToThread(objThread)
    obj.finished.connect(objThread.quit)
    objThread.started.connect(obj.longRunning)
    objThread.finished.connect(app.exit)
    objThread.start()
    sys.exit(app.exec_())

def usingQRunnable():
    app = QtCore.QCoreApplication([])
    runnable = Runnable()
    QtCore.QThreadPool.globalInstance().start(runnable)
    sys.exit(app.exec_())

if __name__ == "__main__":
    usingQThread()
    #usingMoveToThread()
    #usingQRunnable()
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Thanks this definitely looks useful. If I do it using either the QThread or QObject method, can I add in more of my own signals the same way you made the self.finished signal? For instance, if instead of just printing the count, I want to display the value of count in a QSpinBox that is part of my gui from the other class. –  gwenger Jul 22 '11 at 13:34
1  
Yes, you can add your own signals. One way of doing it could be to emit a signal (e.g. pyqtSignal(int)) with the updated value and connect to it from your GUI class to update the QSpinBox accordingly. –  aukaost Jul 22 '11 at 13:42
    
I'm not sure that the usingMoveToThread solution is working in my case, I've tried uncommenting usingMoveToThread() and commenting usingQThread, but when I run the script Increasing is never printed out to the terminal. –  ilpoldo Apr 11 '13 at 12:12
    
I just tried it again using Python 2.7.4 and PyQt4-4.10 and the script still seems to work for me. I'm not sure what your problem could be. –  aukaost Apr 11 '13 at 14:03
1  
I found a strange way to fix it with PyQt 4.6. It seems that QThread::run() is not being called correctly (my guess is this has something to do with QThread::run() no longer being a pure virtual function). This is going to sound dumb but to fix it, just create your own subclass of QThread, reimplement run() and fill in QThread.run(self). Thats it, and it magically works –  Matthew Levine May 22 '13 at 21:04
show 3 more comments

Very nice example from Matt, I fixed the typo and also pyqt4.8 is common now so I removed the dummy class as well and added an example for the dataReady signal

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import sys
from PyQt4 import QtCore, QtGui
from PyQt4.QtCore import Qt


# very testable class (hint: you can use mock.Mock for the signals)
class Worker(QtCore.QObject):
    finished = QtCore.pyqtSignal()
    dataReady = QtCore.pyqtSignal(list, dict)

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()
    def processA(self):
        print "Worker.processA()"
        self.finished.emit()

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot(str, list, list)
    def processB(self, foo, bar=None, baz=None):
        print "Worker.processB()"
        for thing in bar:
            # lots of processing...
            self.dataReady.emit(['dummy', 'data'], {'dummy': ['data']})
        self.finished.emit()


def onDataReady(aList, aDict):
    print 'onDataReady'
    print repr(aList)
    print repr(aDict)


app = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)

thread = QtCore.QThread()  # no parent!
obj = Worker()  # no parent!
obj.dataReady.connect(onDataReady)

obj.moveToThread(thread)

# if you want the thread to stop after the worker is done
# you can always call thread.start() again later
obj.finished.connect(thread.quit)

# one way to do it is to start processing as soon as the thread starts
# this is okay in some cases... but makes it harder to send data to
# the worker object from the main gui thread.  As you can see I'm calling
# processA() which takes no arguments
thread.started.connect(obj.processA)
thread.finished.connect(app.exit)

thread.start()

# another way to do it, which is a bit fancier, allows you to talk back and
# forth with the object in a thread safe way by communicating through signals
# and slots (now that the thread is running I can start calling methods on
# the worker object)
QtCore.QMetaObject.invokeMethod(obj, 'processB', Qt.QueuedConnection,
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(str, "Hello World!"),
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(list, ["args", 0, 1]),
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(list, []))

# that looks a bit scary, but its a totally ok thing to do in Qt,
# we're simply using the system that Signals and Slots are built on top of,
# the QMetaObject, to make it act like we safely emitted a signal for
# the worker thread to pick up when its event loop resumes (so if its doing
# a bunch of work you can call this method 10 times and it will just queue
# up the calls.  Note: PyQt > 4.6 will not allow you to pass in a None
# instead of an empty list, it has stricter type checking

app.exec_()
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According to the Qt developers, subclassing QThread is incorrect (see http://blog.qt.digia.com/blog/2010/06/17/youre-doing-it-wrong/). But that article is really hard to understand (plus the title is a bit condescending). I found a better blog post that gives a more detailed explanation about why you should use one style of threading over another: http://mayaposch.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/how-to-really-truly-use-qthreads-the-full-explanation/

In my opinion, you should probably never subclass thread with the intent to overload the run method. While that does work, you're basically circumventing how Qt wants you to work. Plus you'll miss out on things like events and proper thread safe signals and slots. Plus as you'll likely see in the above blog post, the "correct" way of threading forces you to write more testable code.

Here's a couple of examples of how to take advantage of QThreads in PyQt (I don't really use QRunnable since I like to emit signals from my async code and QRunnable doesnt allow for that very cleanly).

import sys
from PyQt4 import QtCore

# very testable class (hint: you can use mock.Mock for the signals)
class Worker(QtCore.QObject):
    finished = QtCore.pyqtSignal()
    dataReady = QtCore.pyqtSignal(list, dict)

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot()
    def processA(self):
        print "Worker.processA()"
        self.finished.emit()

    @QtCore.pyqtSlot(str, list, list)
    def processB(self, foo, bar=None, baz=None):
        print "Worker.processB()"
        for thing in bar:
            # lots of processing...
            self.dataReady.emit(['dummy', 'data'], {'dummy': ['data']})
        self.finished.emit()


class Thread(QtCore.QThread):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtCore.QThread.__init__(self, parent)

     # this class is solely needed for these two methods, there
     # appears to be a bug in PyQt 4.6 that requires you to
     # explicitly call run and start from the subclass in order
     # to get the thread to actually start an event loop

    def start(self):
        QtCore.QThread.start(self)

    def run(self):
        QtCore.QThread.run(self)


app = QtCore.QApplication(sys.argv)

thread = Thread() # no parent!
obj = Worker() # no parent!
obj.moveToThread(thread)

# if you want the thread to stop after the worker is done
# you can always call thread.start() again later
obj.finished.connect(thread.quit)

# one way to do it is to start processing as soon as the thread starts
# this is okay in some cases... but makes it harder to send data to 
# the worker object from the main gui thread.  As you can see I'm calling
# processA() which takes no arguments
thread.started.connect(obj.processA)
thread.start()

# another way to do it, which is a bit fancier, allows you to talk back and
# forth with the object in a thread safe way by communicating through signals
# and slots (now that the thread is running I can start calling methods on
# the worker object)
QtCore.QMetaObject.invokeMethod(obj, 'processB', Qt.QueuedConnection,
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(str, "Hello World!"),
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(list, ["args", 0, 1],
                                QtCore.Q_ARG(list, []))

# that looks a bit scary, but its a totally ok thing to do in Qt,
# we're simply using the system that Signals and Slots are built on top of,
# the QMetaObject, to make it act like we safely emitted a signal for 
# the worker thread to pick up when its event loop resumes (so if its doing
# a bunch of work you can call this method 10 times and it will just queue
# up the calls.  Note: PyQt > 4.6 will not allow you to pass in a None
# instead of an empty list, it has stricter type checking

app.exec_()
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