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In my scenario, the end user customizes his or her user interface by breaking it into rows and defining the height rule for those rows (fixed, fill space, fit content). I implement this using the WPF Grid.

The Grid starts filling the entire screen, and should not get any bigger - the user MUST be able to see the entire Grid at all times (scroll bars WITHIN rows are okay, but not scroll bars for the entire grid).

The crux of my problem: When the user creates one or more "auto" sized rows, the content in those rows can force the size of the entire grid to expand, introducing scroll bars, even when I've set the max height of the grid to a fixed number.

It gets worse when a star-sized row is involved, because once the grid is stretched a little, that star-sized row fills the available space, so the grid is PERMANENTLY stretched even when the auto-size row later shrinks.

I need to find a way to restrict "auto" rows so that they expand and shrink as needed, BUT the total actual height of all rows is never larger than the entire grid.

To illustrate, I have this grid with fixed max height, and rows representing all size modes.

<Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
    <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
    <RowDefinition Height="200"/>
    <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
</Grid.RowDefinitions>

<ScrollViewer VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto">
    <TextBlock>
        abc<LineBreak/>
        abc<LineBreak/>
        abc<LineBreak/>
        abc<LineBreak/>
        abc<LineBreak/>                    
    </TextBlock>
</ScrollViewer>

In this example, as the "abc" text block expands, the total height of the grid stretches beyond the fixed "300" maximum height. How can I prevent this behavior to guarantee the maximum height of the grid, while keeping the flexibility of the auto-size rows?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, I discovered that I had to subclass Grid so that I could override Measure() and Arrange() layout steps.

I don't claim that this is a great general purpose solution, but it works for my scenario. Note especially that I'm not dealing with columns, since in my case, there's only one column. I'm also not positioning elements within the cells (I'm leaving them anchored at top-left).

If you need a more general solution, I think this is a very good start. The column problem is the same as the row problem, just in the other direction.

class NoStretchGrid:Grid
{
    //this override determines what size we ask to be
    //gotta make sure we never ask for more than the max height
    protected override System.Windows.Size MeasureOverride(System.Windows.Size constraint)
    {
        //what would a basic Grid do?
        System.Windows.Size desiredSize = base.MeasureOverride(constraint);

        if (desiredSize.Height > constraint.Height)
            desiredSize.Height = constraint.Height;

        //if max height is defined and desired height is too big, reduce it
        if (this.MaxHeight != double.NaN && desiredSize.Height > this.MaxHeight)
        {
            desiredSize.Height = this.MaxHeight;
        }

        return desiredSize;
    }

    //this override tells child controls how big they can be and where they're positioned
    protected override System.Windows.Size ArrangeOverride(System.Windows.Size arrangeSize)
    {
        //must decide how tall each row will be
        double[] desiredHeights = new double[this.RowDefinitions.Count];
        double[] minimumHeights = new double[this.RowDefinitions.Count];
        double[] finalHeights = new double[this.RowDefinitions.Count];

        //first, find out how tall each row wants to be

        //check for fixed-size rows
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsAbsolute)
            {
                desiredHeights[i] = this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.Value;
            }
            else
            {
                desiredHeights[i] = 0;
            }

            minimumHeights[i] = this.RowDefinitions[i].MinHeight;
        }

        //then ask children how big they want to be
        foreach (UIElement child in this.InternalChildren)
        {
            int row = Grid.GetRow(child);
            if (!this.RowDefinitions[row].Height.IsAbsolute && child.DesiredSize.Height > desiredHeights[row])
            {
                desiredHeights[row] = child.DesiredSize.Height;
            }

            if ((child as FrameworkElement).MinHeight > minimumHeights[row])
            {
                minimumHeights[row] = (child as FrameworkElement).MinHeight;
            }
        }

        double availableHeight = arrangeSize.Height;

        //reserve minimum heights
        for (int i = 0; i < minimumHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            finalHeights[i] = minimumHeights[i];
            availableHeight -= finalHeights[i];
        }            

        //allow fixed-height rows their height - if some ignoramus made fixed-heights too big, we can't help him
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsAbsolute)
            {
                finalHeights[i] = this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.Value;
                availableHeight = availableHeight + minimumHeights[i] - finalHeights[i];
            }
        }

        //allow auto-size rows their desired heights, so long as there's height left to be had
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {                
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsAuto)
            {
                double desiredHeightIncrease = desiredHeights[i] - minimumHeights[i];

                if (desiredHeightIncrease <= availableHeight)
                {
                    finalHeights[i] += desiredHeightIncrease;
                    availableHeight -= desiredHeightIncrease;
                }
                else
                {
                    finalHeights[i] = minimumHeights[i] + availableHeight;
                    availableHeight = 0;
                }
            }
        }

        //now that auto-size rows have been prevented from getting out of control, make the min heights of any star-size rows available again
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsStar)
            {
                availableHeight += minimumHeights[i];
            }
        }

        //divide any leftover available height proportionally amongst the star-sized rows, while there's height left to be had
        double totalStarValues = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsStar)
            {
                totalStarValues += this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.Value;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < desiredHeights.Length; i++)
        {
            if (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.IsStar)
            {
                finalHeights[i] = availableHeight * (this.RowDefinitions[i].Height.Value / totalStarValues);
            }
        }

        //decide the vertical position of each row
        double[] rowPositions = new double[desiredHeights.Length];
        rowPositions[0] = 0;
        for (int i = 1; i < rowPositions.Length; i++)
        {
            rowPositions[i] = rowPositions[i - 1] + finalHeights[i - 1];
        }

        //tell children to lay themselves out based on these results
        foreach (UIElement child in this.InternalChildren)
        {
            int row = Grid.GetRow(child);

            //special case for scrollviewer, which doesn't size itself appropriately
            if (child is ScrollViewer)
            {
                ScrollViewer scrollViewer = child as ScrollViewer;

                //temporarily update its height value, JUST for the Arrange() call
                double oldHeight = scrollViewer.Height;
                scrollViewer.Height = finalHeights[row];
                child.Arrange(new Rect(0, rowPositions[row], arrangeSize.Width, finalHeights[row]));

                //restore the original value
                scrollViewer.Height = oldHeight;
            }

            //typical case for non-scroll-viewers
            else
            {
                child.Arrange(new Rect(0, rowPositions[row], arrangeSize.Width, finalHeights[row]));
            }
        }

        return arrangeSize;
    }
}

Here's a test case. Drop this in a Window and resize the window to see it working.

<local:NoStretchGrid VerticalAlignment="Stretch">

    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="Auto"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="2*"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="50"/>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>

    <ScrollViewer VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Visible" MinHeight="50">
        <Rectangle Fill="Orange" Height="250"/>
    </ScrollViewer>

    <ScrollViewer VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Visible" Grid.Row="1" MinHeight="50">
        <Rectangle Fill="Blue" Height="200"/>
    </ScrollViewer>

    <Grid Background="Pink" Grid.Row="2" MinHeight="30"/>
    <Grid Background="Green" Grid.Row="3" MinHeight="30"/>
    <Grid Background="Red" Grid.Row="4"/>

</local:NoStretchGrid>
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