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Suppose I have a template class called LinkedList that also contains a method called Sort I want to be able to have a default comparator which is assuming the type T can be compared with the < operator.

However, I want to be able to override that for other types.

This is part of a custom library that I'm extending. No STL.

e.g.

template <class T, class Comparator<T> >
class LinkedList
{
  ...
  Node* MergeSort(Node* list)
  {
      ...
      if (Comparator<T>(nodeA,nodeB))
      ...
  }
  ...
};


typedef Pair<int, int> ListEntry;

struct sorter
{
    inline sorter(){}
    inline bool operator()(ListEntry const& a, ListEntry const& b)
    {
        return a.second < b.second;
    }
};

Pair<int, int> entry;
LinkedList<ListEntry, sorter()> list;

list.PushFront( ListEntry(5,9) );
list.PushFront( ListEntry(77,5) );
list.PushFront( ListEntry(4,1) );
list.PushFront( ListEntry(8,44) );
list.PushFront( ListEntry(1,64) );
list.PushFront( ListEntry(3,5) );
n = list.MergeSort(node* n);

This is roughly what my class looks like. Actually MergeSort is a private data member but I've temporarily made it public just while I fool around and try to make it work. MergeSort will eventually be called by Sort.

I haven't been able to compile this. Just wondering how you would normally pass Functor objects around like this.

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1  
How about you tell us what compiler errors you get, if you want us to solve them? –  sth Jul 22 '11 at 1:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot say template <class T, class Comparator<T>>, i.e. have one template parameter be itself a parameter of another parameter. Do it like the standard library does it and use default parameters:

template <class T, class Comparator = std::less<T>>
class MyClass
{
  ...
}

Also, Comparator is going to be an object that you need to instantiate at some point. Again, default arguments are the key:

void MyClass::doSomething(Foo x, Comparator comp = Comparator())
{
  /* ... */
  if (comp(a, b)) { /* ... */ }
  /* ... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That seems to make sense. However I'm getting some compiler errors. See updates above. –  Matt Jul 22 '11 at 1:02
    
Sorted! never mind. I had a typo. thanks alot for your help. –  Matt Jul 22 '11 at 1:12
1  
I think you need a space between the 2 >s at the end of your template declaration: template <class T, class Comparator = std::less<T> > for it to compile with g++ at least. –  Hoons Jan 19 '12 at 22:10
1  
@Hoons: Say -std=c++0x :-) –  Kerrek SB Jan 20 '12 at 2:01
    
@KerrekSB Thanks! That's good to know. I'm still living in the stone age... –  Hoons Jan 20 '12 at 3:24

I don't see a reason why the functor type should be part of the type of the list: if it's a straight linked list sorting is not part of the invariants and of what the list does unless when calling the MergeSort member specifically. I'd suggest making it a template parameter of that member:

template<typename T>
struct LinkedList {
    template<typename Functor>
    Node*
    MergeSort(Node* node, Functor f) {
        // ...
        if(f(NodeA, NodeB)) {
            // ...
        }
        // ...
     }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Hm, yes, of course -- I was only looking at the trees, not the forest. That said, how much more are we going to copy from std::list into this post? :-) –  Kerrek SB Jul 22 '11 at 0:58
    
Thanks for the hint. –  Matt Jul 22 '11 at 1:12

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