Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone enumerate everything to which I am exposing myself (and my site) by running/deploying my Grails App with "grails run-app" rather than doing it "correctly" with a .war file?

Grails.org saysL

Grails should never be deployed using the grails run-app command as this sets Grails up in "development" mode which has additional overheads.

Is it only performance, or is there a security issue there too?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Performance is the big difference. If you must use run-app be sure to run 'grails prod run-app' so at least some of the optimizations are in place. run-app is designed to be devloper-friendly, with lots of reloading, and the corresponding file system scans that are necessary to support that.

When running in a war, GSPs are precompiled, which saves permgen significantly and results in much faster performance. There's nearly no caching in run-app since as a developer you don't want to have to restart, but in production you usually only need to make changes for a redeployment, so caching is much more aggressive.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again Burt, I just updated my question to specifically include security. Is there anything about development mode that is known/theorized to be extra exploitable? –  Mikey Jul 22 '11 at 1:20
1  
Not that I know of. Performance is the big thing. There are other issues too, e.g. you can't cluster, you have a much harder time customizing the server (e.g. no server.xml), etc. Plus you need Grails installed to use run-app, whereas a war file is self-contained and will work in many servlet containers with no configuration. –  Burt Beckwith Jul 22 '11 at 2:13
    
I'm accepting this even though I feel like it's lulling me into a false sense of security about my morbidly slow deployment. –  Mikey Jul 27 '11 at 21:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.