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I was trying to setup this "when you click outside of the element, close it" type of thing using some code I found on Stackoverflow:

$(document).click(function() {
 $('.list-to-hide').hide();
});

$('.show-list-button').click(function(event) {
 event.stopPropagation();
});

Could someone explain the later part with stopPrpagation? I don't understand its needs.

Thanks! Matt

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Imagine this:

<div>
    DIV
    <span>
        Span
    </span>
<div>

and:

$('div').click(function() { alert('div clicked'); });
$('span').click(function() { alert('span clicked'); });

Check out what happens when you click each one

When you click the span, it happens to also trigger the div because your also clicking the div.

Now if we wanted to alert the span only we need to stop the div click from triggering when we click on the span so we do this:

$('div').click(function() { alert('div clicked'); });
$('span').click(function(e) { alert('span clicked'); e.stopPropagation(); });

See what happens now

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Your example code is missing a vital part:

$(document).click(function() {
    $('.list-to-hide').hide();
});

$('.show-list-button').click(function(event) {
    event.stopPropagation();
    $('.list-to-hide').show();
});

Without the event.stopPropagation(), it would show the list, and then hide it because the .show-list-button is inside the $(document) so both click handlers would fire. event.stopPropagation() basically says only apply this click event to THIS CHILD NODE and don't tell the parent containers anything because I don't want them to react.

Think about it this way - you rent a hooker for $100. She gives $80 to her pimp. event.stopPropagation() is like telling her to keep all $100 cuz the pimp doesn't need to know anything about what just happened (and neither does your wife, eh?).

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Okay, that's a good explanation, but say I click on the .show-list-button. Why doesn't the browser decide to first think of it as a document click? Is there some weighing system it uses to decide which function to notify about the click first? –  Matt Jul 22 '11 at 2:19
    
For more material you'd better see Event order and stackoverflow.com/questions/2661199/… –  Ghostoy Jul 22 '11 at 3:15
3  
+1 for the hooker analogy. –  Fred Jul 22 '11 at 4:17
    
Great, thanks!! –  Matt Jul 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Best answer ever. +1 –  Maverick Aug 2 '11 at 13:51

event.stopPropagation(); prevents the event from bubbling up the DOM. Without this line, clicking on .show-list-button the click handler for document will fire also. With it, the document click will not fire.

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Have you read this ?

http://api.jquery.com/event.stopPropagation/

It prevents the event from bubbling up the DOM tree, preventing any parent handlers from being notified of the event.

Example

Kill the bubbling on the click event.

$("p").click(function(event){
  event.stopPropagation();
  // do something
}); 
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