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I have created a projectile motion simulation in Java with a user interface. The program allows the user to enter in initial values to calculate the projectile of the object. I don't have anything currently set up to draw the projectile onto the screen.

I have a separate spring worker thread handling the simulation code in the background.

I also have added in collision detection so that when the object hits the ground it will bounce and continue doing so until the loop exits.

The equations that I have in place are not correct for what I am trying to achieve.

With the following initial conditions, here is what a plot of the outputted data yields:

Initial Conditions:
Angle: 30 degrees;
Initial Speed 8.66 m/s;
Height: 50 m;
Elasticity of object: .5 coefficient of restitution in the y direction;
Acceleration: -9.8 m/s^2;
No acceleration in the x direction

enter image description here

It appears that once the simulation begins, y just gets bigger and bigger, so the loop will never exit by itself.

Here is the code:

    //This class will handle all time consuming activities
class Simulation extends SwingWorker<Void, Void>
{
    //Execute time consuming task
    protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception 
    {
        FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter("output.txt");

        BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream);

        double angle = Double.valueOf(angleText.getText());
        double radians = angle * (Math.PI/180); 
        double vel = Double.valueOf(speedText.getText()); 
        double mass = Double.valueOf(massText.getText()); 
        double y = Double.valueOf(heightText.getText());
        double x = 0;
        double epX = Double.valueOf(epxText.getText());
        double epY = Double.valueOf(epyText.getText());
        double ax = Double.valueOf(accxText.getText());
        double ay = Double.valueOf(accyText.getText()); 

        int numBounces = 0;
        double deltaTime = .00000001; 
        double total_velocity = 0.0;
        double time = 0.0;

        String fs; 

        angle = angle * Math.PI / 180; 

        while(numBounces < 10)
        {
            //Increment Time
            time = time + deltaTime;

            //Calculate new values for velocity[x] and velocity[y]
            double vx = (vel*Math.cos(angle)) + ax*time;;
            double vy = (vel*Math.sin(angle)) + ay*time; 

            //Calculate new values for x and y
            x = x + vx*time;
            y = y + vy*time + .5*ay*(time*time); 

            System.out.format("%.3f\n", y); 

            fs = String.format("%f\t %f\t %f\t %f\t %f\t %f\t %f\t\n", ax, ay, x, y, vx, vy, time); 

            out.write(fs); 

            //If ball hits ground: y < 0
            if(y < 0)
            {
                numBounces++;

                System.out.println("Number of Bounces: " + numBounces); 

                //Why is this statement needed if the velocity in the y direction is already being reversed?
                vy = -vy - ay*time; //  vy = -vy - ay*time; 

                //Calculate angle
                angle = Math.atan(vy/vx);

                angle = angle * Math.PI / 180; 

                //Calculate total velocity
                total_velocity = Math.sqrt((vy*vy) + (vx*vx));

                //Velocity with elasticity factored in
                total_velocity = Math.sqrt((epY) * total_velocity);

                //New velocities for when ball makes next trip
                vy = total_velocity*Math.sin(angle); 
                vx = total_velocity*Math.cos(angle);

                out.write(fs); 

            }

            //Draw projectile

                //Thread.sleep(.00001); //Sleep for deltaTime - 10 nanoseconds or draw after n number of points
        }

        out.close(); 

        return null;
    }

    //SwingWorker lets you execute code on the event dispatching thread. Also allows you to update the GUI
    public void done()
    {
        try
        {               
            /*
            rangeText.setText(" " + x);
            heightTText.setText(" " + y); 
            timeText.setText(" " + time);
             */
        }

        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

What could be the possible problem? My guess is that it might have something to do with the angle. In a previous version of the code, where I did not factor in an angle, it worked fine. Also, I am not sure if bounds on the GUI have to be set up so that y won't go on forever.

I also have a NullPointerException.

share|improve this question
    
The NullPointerException extract isn't a stack trace, which might be useful - instead, it's showing the bytecode for the NullPointerException class - which never changes, and thus provides no insight into the problem. Wrap your background task in a try/catch block that catches Throwable and does a printStackTrace. –  Ed Staub Jul 22 '11 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

The first problem I see is here:

//Calculate angle
angle = Math.atan(vy/vx);
angle = angle * Math.PI / 180; 

Math.atan returns a value in radians already:

Returns the arc tangent of a value; the returned angle is in the range -pi/2 through pi/2.

So the * Math.PI / 180 is not going to do you any favors.

The second problem is here:

//Calculate new values for velocity[x] and velocity[y]
double vx = (vel*Math.cos(angle)) + ax*time;;
double vy = (vel*Math.sin(angle)) + ay*time; 

Every pass through the loop, these values are reinitialized. Because angle, ax, ay, and time cannot change during the loop, that means you always end up with the same vx and (positive) vy. vy should be getting smaller with each loop pass, something more like:

//Calculate initial values for velocity[x] and velocity[y]
double vx = (vel*Math.cos(angle)) + ax*time;
double vy = (vel*Math.sin(angle)) + ay*time; 

while(numBounces < 10) {
    //Increment Time
    time = time + deltaTime;

    //Calculate new values for x and y
    x = x + vx*time;
    y = y + vy*time + .5*ay*(time*time); 

    //Calculate new values for velocity[x] and velocity[y]
    vx += ax * time;
    vy += ay * time;
share|improve this answer
    
So the initial angle that is entered in by the user is converted to radians, but then the new angle that is calculated by Math.atan is in degrees? Should I just keep this line 'angle = angle * Math.PI / 180;' to avoid any inconsistency? –  kachilous Jul 22 '11 at 2:32
    
The initial angle that is entered in by the user is converted to radians (although for some reason you have a radians variable that is never used in this example). Then Math.atan gives you an angle in radians, which you immediately multiply by Math.PI and divide by 180; all this does is take your angle in radians and divide it by roughly 57. If you remove the "angle = angle * Math.PI / 180" after the "Math.atan" line, things can only improve. –  Richard Campbell Jul 22 '11 at 2:37
    
Yes, because I realized that Math.cos/Math.sin only take in radians so had to add in that statement so the user's angle could be converted. –  kachilous Jul 22 '11 at 2:40
    
You try to convert the angle that came out of Math.atan from degrees to radians, though. Math.atan already returns radians. Look inside the loop. –  Richard Campbell Jul 22 '11 at 2:45
    
ok so i can just get rid of that line. also i've realized that y gets bigger and bigger and the values of vx and vy don't ever change. although their calculated values are correct, they just stay constant –  kachilous Jul 22 '11 at 2:50

You need to learn to use a debugger - in Eclipse, for instance. Then you can stop wherever you want and examine variables until you figure out exactly where you're taking a wrong turn (or not taking a right one, in this case). You'll be able to figure this out in a minute or so.

If that's not an option, start putting in console printlns of key data.

Code always has errors, and you often can't figure them out just by looking at it - no matter how hard and how long.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I put in print statements and used a debugger to determine that the values of y are increasing and never decreasing. That seems to be the main issue –  kachilous Jul 22 '11 at 2:35
    
Keep going! So y's not right - what affects the value of y? Which of them are wrong? Look at it's inputs - are they right? If not, keep going... if they're right, zoom in on your calculation where the first bad value shows up. –  Ed Staub Jul 22 '11 at 2:43
    
It looks like after vx and vy are calculated they continue to stay the same while y gets larger and larger –  kachilous Jul 22 '11 at 2:59

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