Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does anyone know how send() works with generators when used recursively? I expected the value to be passed to the current generator, which could then pass it down to the recursed-generator...but it seems that is not the case? Some example code:

def Walk(obj):
  recurse = (yield obj)
  if not recurse:
    print 'stop recurse:', recurse
    return

  if isinstance(obj, list):
    print 'is list:', obj
    for item in obj:
      print 'item loop:', item
      walker = Walk(item)
      for x in walker:
        print 'item walk:', x
        recurse = (yield x)
        print 'item walk recurse:', recurse
        walker.send(recurse)

root = ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]

walker = Walk(root)
for i, x in enumerate(walker):
  print i, x
  print 'send true'
  walker.send(True)

The desired output is should be each value at each level recursion:

0 ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]
1 'a'
2 ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]
3 'b.0'
4 ['b.0.0']
5 'b.0.0'

What ends up happening is:

0 ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]
send true
is list: ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]
item loop: a
item walk: a
item walk recurse: None
stop recurse: None

It looks like the inner-loop with recurse = (yield) doesn't wait for a value to be sent. Or something. Its not really clear how the inner-loop recurse value is getting None; its caller does call send().

Ultimately, the goal is basically to walk over a tree-structure recursively, but have the top-most caller be able to specify when not to recurse into a substructure. e.g.,

walker = Walk(root)
for node in walker:
  if CriteriaMet(node):
    walker.send(True)
  else:
    walker.send(False)
share|improve this question
1  
Anyone else reminded of (cdr(car(cdr(cdr(cdr(car(car lst)))))))? –  cwallenpoole Jul 22 '11 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The important thing to realize is that send() also consumes!
From http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#generator.send:

Resumes the execution and “sends” a value into the generator function. The value argument becomes the result of the current yield expression. The send() method returns the next value yielded by the generator, or raises StopIteration if the generator exits without yielding another value. When send() is called to start the generator, it must be called with None as the argument, because there is no yield expression that could receive the value.

Here is a quick re-working of your code to get it to output as expected:

def Walk(obj):
  recurse = (yield obj)
  if not recurse:
    #print 'stop recurse:', recurse
    return

  if isinstance(obj, list):
    #print 'is list:', obj
    for item in obj:
      #print 'item loop:', item
      walker = Walk(item)

      recurse = None #first send must be None
      while True:
        try:
          x = walker.send(recurse)
        except StopIteration:
          break
        #print 'item walk:', x
        recurse = (yield x)
        #print 'item walk recurse:', recurse

root = ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]

walker = Walk(root)
i = 0
x = walker.next()
while True:
  print i, x
  try:
    x = walker.send(True)
  except StopIteration:
    break
  i += 1

Output:

0 ['a', ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]]
1 a
2 ['b.0', ['b.0.0']]
3 b.0
4 ['b.0.0']
5 b.0.0
share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh, man, dunno how I missed that. That's really unfortunate, though -- having to use while True over for...in really makes using the generator send() approach unappealing. –  Richard Levasseur Jul 27 '11 at 4:07
    
For what you're doing, yes. Generators can serve 2 purposes - for iteration or for development of coroutines. Since you want to stick with the iterator protocol and your code example doesn't display a need to constantly communicate with the coroutine, I'm sure you really only need to specify whether to recursively walk once at the top level (instead of specifying after each consumption). If that's the case, just make it an argument to the generator - def walk(obj, recurse = True): ... - to pass it once on the creation of the walk generator. –  Jeremy Brown Jul 27 '11 at 14:08
    
Well, I actually do need to control the recursion at each level. The real use-case is walking an object-hierarchy to figure out whether data needs to be saved to the database(both the hierarchy and criteria are rather complex). It might be cleaner to pass in a predicate function to control the recursion. –  Richard Levasseur Jul 27 '11 at 15:46
    
Maybe you can let the coroutines share state via a mutable object? They yield to each other within a single context, so changing the state would be safe. shared_state = {"recurse" : True}; gen = walk(obj, shared_state); for i, x in enumerate(gen): ...; shared_state["recurse"] = False. –  Jeremy Brown Jul 27 '11 at 15:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.