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Basically there seems to be a problem when a list of lists is made by appending a list to another list using list.append(). The problem is that the entire column is changed to the value you set it to for the index you give. for example the code here

b = [1,1,1]
c = []
c.append(b)
c.append(b)
c.append(b)
c[0][0] = 4

and if you print c you would get: [[4,1,1][4,1,1][4,1,1]] instead of [[4,1,1][1,1,1][1,1,1]]

So my question is how would you be able to end up with the list to the right rather than what actually happens.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you've observed is normal and expected behavior in Python and any decent tutorial should cover it.

c.append(b)
c.append(b)
c.append(b)

This appends to c three references to the list b. Since it's the same list, changing one reference changes it in all four places it's referenced, including b by the way.

If you don't want this behavior, copy the list.

c.append(b[:])
c.append(b[:])
c.append(b[:])
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the same happends with dictionaries ;-) in that case use dict.copy() – Fitoria Jul 22 '11 at 3:08
    
the same happens with all mutable objects – warvariuc Jul 22 '11 at 5:17

Make a new copy of the list each time you append it:

b = [1,1,1]
c = []
c.append(list(b))
c.append(list(b))
c.append(list(b))
c[0][0] = 4

The reason you're having problems is because lists are stored as a reference to the actual list object - and thus your version of c has 3 copies of the same reference, all pointing at the same actual [1,1,1] object. Using the list() function makes new copies so that the references point at separate objects.

share|improve this answer
    
To add to this: in Python everything is stored as references to the actual object. You should always think of any kind of assignment as putting a reference to an object somewhere ("any kind of assignment" includes putting things into containers). You can have similar problems with any other kind of object if you put it into a list multiple times (or into multiple lists, etc). Not even the immutable built-in primitive objects (which include numbers, strings, and tuples) are exceptions to this; they're just immutable so you can't get into very much trouble with them if you forget this rule. – Ben Jul 22 '11 at 3:18

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