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An example to illustrate is the Synopsis of my own Test::Version.

use Test::More;
use Test::Version 0.04;

# test blib or lib by default
version_all_ok();

done_testing;

I don't have to include parenthesis on done_testing(); I can simply call it. However when I've tried to call version_all_ok; ( note: First attempt at Dist::Zilla::Plugin::Test::Version failed this way) I get an error. Why is this?

Update Perhaps my example is not quite as good as I've thought. The actual error I've gotten is

Bareword "version_all_ok" not allowed while "strict subs" in use at t/release-test-version.t line 19.

and here's the full code

#!/usr/bin/perl

BEGIN {
  unless ($ENV{RELEASE_TESTING}) {
    require Test::More;
    Test::More::plan(skip_all => 'these tests are for release candidate testing');
  }
}

use 5.006;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Test::More;

eval "use Test::Version";
plan skip_all => "Test::Version required for testing versions"
    if $@;

version_all_ok; # of course line 19, and version_all_ok() works here.
done_testing;

The following should be relevant snippets pulled from Test::Version 1.0.0 for exportation.

use parent 'Exporter';
our @EXPORT = qw( version_all_ok ); ## no critic (Modules::ProhibitAutomaticExportation)
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( version_ok );
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lot's of great answers here... so I'm just gonna pick one, though more than one of them is correct. –  xenoterracide Jul 27 '11 at 10:17

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Fundamentally, because Perl needs to know that a bareword means a function call in order to parse it as a function call. There are two ways Perl might learn this interesting fact:

  1. You might have decorated the bareword like a function call, prepending & or -> or appending (...) or both. Perl will trust that you know what you're talking about and parse the bareword as a function call even if it doesn't yet know what function it will have to call.

  2. You might have declared a function with that name before Perl tries to parse the call. Ordinarily, use-ing a module is enough to ensure the symbols get created at the right time; you're doing something wrong in Test::Version such that the symbol is not getting exported until after it is needed to compile the test script.

In your code, you wrap the use inside an eval, which effectively delays it until execution time. Consequently, the symbol version_all_ok is not available when Perl tries to compile the call and it blows up. Forcing the eval to compile time should suffice to make the symbol available:

BEGIN {
    eval "use Test::Version";
    plan skip_all => "Test::Version required for testing versions"
        if $@;
}
share|improve this answer

This example shows (clearly I think) that all you need is to predeclare the function.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

sub hi {
  print "hi\n";
}

hi; #could be `hi();`
bye();  #could not be `bye;`

sub bye {
  print "bye\n";
}

If your sensibilities require that you define your subroutines at the bottom, but you want them to be callable without parens (as though predeclared), you may use the subs pragma:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use subs qw/hi bye/;

hi;
bye;

sub hi {
  print "hi\n";
}

sub bye {
  print "bye\n";
}

UPDATE: It would appear that the subs pragma can even alleviate problems from string evals. You might try a use subs 'version_all_ok'; near the top of your script. My proof of concept:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use subs qw/hi bye/;

eval <<'DECLARE';
sub bye {
  print "bye\n";
}
DECLARE

hi;
bye;

sub hi {
  print "hi\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, though I wonder why then that Perl thinks my function isn't predeclared... (where thinks means isn't but the reason isn't obvious to me) –  xenoterracide Jul 22 '11 at 20:23
1  
I have to think its the loading in an eval rather than a straight compile-time use. Its not often that the compile-time vs run-time problem hits you. Its the compiler that throws the error. I guess what I should have said in my answer is 'predeclared at compile-time.' –  Joel Berger Jul 22 '11 at 20:40
    
@xenoterracide, see my update –  Joel Berger Jul 22 '11 at 20:47

I can't duplicate this using Test::Version 1.0.0 or 0.04. Is it possible you weren't exporting what you thought you were?

Can you double check and provide both the full script that failed, the error message, and full script that succeeded, and the perl version you are using?

Update: ok, you are loading Test::Version at runtime; that means that when version_all_ok is encountered at compile time, there is no such subroutine. There isn't any way around this without modifying the test script in some way, such as:

my $has_test_version;
BEGIN { $has_test_version = eval "use Test::Version; 1" }
plan skip_all => "Test::Version required for testing versions" if ! $has_test_version;
share|improve this answer
    
I've updated the question doing just this. –  xenoterracide Jul 22 '11 at 20:19
    
@xenoterracide: updated by answer –  ysth Jul 22 '11 at 20:23
    
@ysth, It would appear that the subs pragma can help with string eval'ed function declarations, perhaps this will also help string eval'ed module loading. –  Joel Berger Jul 22 '11 at 20:54
    
@Joel: yes, but better to just make sure the module is loaded at compile time –  ysth Jul 23 '11 at 0:01
    
@ysth, probably true –  Joel Berger Jul 23 '11 at 0:23

It just needs to be declared before your use, still using the parentheses or ampersand should be used for distinction and clarity.

share|improve this answer
    
the ampersand has special meanings and shouldn't be used just for clarity because unintended consequences may occur. parens are encouraged for clarity. –  Joel Berger Jul 22 '11 at 17:01
    
Yes and no, it should be used for clarity and distinction, when appropriate. Like what you probably meant, ampersands provide functions with other functionality, such as the inherit pass of @_. See the perldoc for more info. –  user802675 Jul 23 '11 at 17:05

It's allowed if the function has been declared before, and it would be treated as a list operator (WARNING: it could change operator precedence!)

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could anyone who give me a downvote explain where I'm wrong? –  LeleDumbo Jul 23 '11 at 8:48

From Programming Perl, chapter 29 Functions:

Predefined Perl functions may be used either with or without parentheses around their arguments; the syntax summaries in this chapter omit the parentheses. If you do use parentheses, the simple but occasionally surprising rule is this: if it looks like a function, then it is a function, so precedence doesn't matter. Otherwise, it's a list operator or unary operator, and precedence does matter. Be careful, because even if you put whitespace between the keyword and its left parenthesis, that doesn't keep it from being a function

Found on p.677 (missing online at Google Books due to copyright) -- every Perl programmer should have the camel book.

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The question is not related to the ability to invoke builtins without parens; it's explicitly about how calls to subs are parsed. –  darch Jul 22 '11 at 4:37
2  
@darch a predefined function doesn't have to be a builtin. Predefinition doesn't imply native and doesn't distinguish author. Predefined means it has been declared before it has been called, please learn the semantics. –  vol7ron Jul 22 '11 at 4:40
    
"Declared" means "has been declared". When Programming Perl uses the word "predefined", it's exactly talking about things built into Perl. In fact, the sentence you quoted is explicit about it. Please do a text search. –  darch Jul 22 '11 at 4:54
2  
please don't link to pirated material –  brian d foy Jul 22 '11 at 6:30
2  
@Brian, you're exactly right (+1)... I hope someone can erase it from the rollback history. I didn't check the path from Google. BTW, do you know if a new version of the book is planned to be released? This one is getting pretty old :) –  vol7ron Jul 22 '11 at 13:36

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